Virtualization Security

Virtualization Security focuses upon end-to-end security, integrity, auditability, and regulatory compliance for virtualization and clouds. Virtualization Security starts where the cloud and virtual environments begin: the end user computing device. (Read More)

We follow the user through the virtual and cloud stacks until they reach the application the user wishes to use to retrieve the data that is important to them. Virtualization and cloud security is implemented where there is an intersection between user, data, and application while maintain strict control of management interfaces. As such virtualization security looks into all aspects of security devices, tools, controls, and guides that impact or can be used to secure virtual and cloud environments.

Virtualization Security at VMworld

VirtualizationSecurityIt is that time of year again, when we see all the new toys, tools, ideas, and processes that make up the show called VMworld. This year, quite a few changes in virtualization security will be discussed by VMware and other organizations that work with virtual and cloud environments. One of the key messages will be that everyone needs to stop treating virtualization security as something unique and different. Instead of this type of treatment, we have been seeing the extension of existing tools and techniques into virtual and cloud environments. Virtualization and cloud security is a natural progression of all organizational security.
Continue reading Virtualization Security at VMworld

Building Your Own IT Community

VirtualizationSecurityOn the August 7 Virtualization Security podcast, we discussed how people in virtualization, security, compliance, data protection, storage, and networking—and everyone else in IT—should form their own organizational communities to improve overall communication and establish easy access to experts in those fields. This thought came out of a conversation I had with @jtroyer about whether or not IT should be a community instead of seeing its various components as silos. Even to this day, we are seeing more silos and fewer communities. The lines have just been drawn differently. Continue reading Building Your Own IT Community

News: Splunk Announces Splunk App for Stream

PerformanceManagementSplunk acquired Cloudmeter back in December 2013. Splunk App for Stream is the result of this acquisition. It gives Splunk customers the ability to parse network data and add that data to their Splunk datastores.

The Splunk App for Stream

The Splunk App for Stream consists of two components. An agent sits inside of the network stack of the operating system (Windows or Linux). All network traffic for that operating system instance passes through this agent, and it can capture any portion of that traffic and forward it to the Splunk datastore. The second component is a user interface that allows the user to specify the application from which to collect data and the fields within that stream for that application to capture. This is crucial to avoid overloading the Splunk datastore with the most voluminous type of data (wire data) and to avoid overrunning the license limits on the Splunk installation. As Leena Joshi, Splunk’s senior director of solutions marketing, explained:

“The Splunk App for Stream, the first product delivered from our acquisition of Cloudmeter last year, is a new approach that magnifies the Operational Intelligence organizations can gain with Splunk software…Unlike traditional and appliance-based solutions, which are difficult to deploy, especially in public cloud infrastructures, the Splunk App for Stream can be added to gain immediate wire data access on-premises or in public, private or hybrid cloud infrastructures. It opens up for our customers a whole new class of data sets to correlate for additional IT, security and business insights.”

The Application Performance Management, IT operations management, and security use cases for Splunk App for Stream are summarized as follows:

Application Management
IT Operations Management

Where (and Where Not) to Use the Splunk App for Stream

The amount of wire data and Splunk’s pricing per amount of data ingested per day will make it prohibitively expensive to just dump all of the wire data from your hundreds or thousands of servers directly into your Splunk datastore. The good news is that Splunk gives you a very fine-grained way to control this with the user interface for Stream. However, the need and the ability to control the amount of data you ask App for Stream to collect and send to the datastore drives the use cases for this app. For example:

  • If you have a very small number of custom-developed applications that are critical to your business, and you know enough about them (since you built them) to know what data fields to expect on the wire, you can configure App for Stream to capture only the critical fields related to those critical applications. If you have hundreds or thousands of applications that are a mixture of purchased and custom-developed applications, then you need an AA-IPM solution, like those profiled in “Who’s Who in Application Performance Management for the SDDC and Cloud.”
  • If you are in IT Operations, App for Stream could be a valuable complement to Splunk’s App for VMware and the Apps for Citrix. If you know specific things represent problems in the network, you can set up App for Stream to look for them ahead of time, instead of running a trace and looking through a mountain of data after the fact.
  • The same holds true for security. If you know ahead of time what kind of an event on the network is associated with a security threat, you can set up App for Stream to find these for you instead of waiting for the event to happen and then doing a search.

This announcement also signals an important shift in strategy for Splunk. Prior to App for Stream, Splunk only collected data from management interfaces like syslog, SNMP, WMI, vSphere API, etc. Now Splunk has taken the extra step of collecting unique and valuable data that only vendors who specialize in this type of data collection provide. One can only speculate as to where this will lead.

Links to more information about Splunk App for Stream:


The Splunk App for Stream adds configurable slices of wire data to the Splunk datastore. This is a valuable additional source of data, but it is not on its own a complete network-based application performance, IT operations management, or security solution.

Will Open Source Kill Splunk?

PerformanceManagementOver at, Matt Asay published a blog post entitled “In A World Of Open Source Big Data, Splunk Should Not Exist.” He then does a pretty good job of debunking his own thesis and explaining why customers continue to pay Splunk big bucks to do what it does. However, since there is so much noise around the question of open-source big data tools as alternatives to Splunk, this question deserves further exploration.

Continue reading Will Open Source Kill Splunk?

SecDevOps: What Security Can Do Today

agilecloudOn the June 24, 2014 Virtualization Security Podcast, we discussed SecDevOps with Andi Mann of CA Technologies. Andi pointed out fairly early that he does not like the term or the “DevOpsSec” term. Security needs to be considered at every step of the way, he stressed: neither before nor after Dev, but marching along with DevOps and Agile methodologies. As such, the question that comes to mind is how security can get involved with DevOps and Agile methodologies. So, we came up with some practical advice. Continue reading SecDevOps: What Security Can Do Today

Security Wrapped Data

VirtualizationSecurityOn the July third Virtualization Security Podcast, we discussed mobile security with Harry Labana, CPO of CloudVolumes, and Ben Goodman of VMware. Actually, it was not necessarily about mobile security as much as it was about security in accessing corporate data from mobile devices, regardless of device and location of data. What came out of this conversation was twofold: some actionable items you (the end user, security, stakeholders) can take today, and a desire for something more—a way to wrap a security context around some data accessible by any program. Continue reading Security Wrapped Data