Virtualization Security

Virtualization Security focuses upon end-to-end security, integrity, auditability, and regulatory compliance for virtualization and clouds. Virtualization Security starts where the cloud and virtual environments begin: the end user computing device. (Read More)

We follow the user through the virtual and cloud stacks until they reach the application the user wishes to use to retrieve the data that is important to them. Virtualization and cloud security is implemented where there is an intersection between user, data, and application while maintain strict control of management interfaces. As such virtualization security looks into all aspects of security devices, tools, controls, and guides that impact or can be used to secure virtual and cloud environments.

Bromium release vSentry 1.1: trustworthiness for more desktops in the enterprise?

PresentationVirtualizationBromium have released vSentry 1.1 which will brings Bromium’s benefits of micro-virtualization and hardware based security to a far wider range of enterprise desktops. This is the release you’ve been waiting for: and if you’ve not been waiting, this is definitely the release to consider.

We’ve spoken before about Bromium when they unveiled their micro-virtualization trustworthy security vision. Bromium’s message and focus was simple “standard workspace security is reactive, not proactive“. Whatever you have in terms of anti-virus or malware detection is only good once a new threat is found,  understood,  a patch created and deployed. This poses the very important question “what is the impact of the time delay between threat found and threat contained?”.  Bromium’s goal was to dramatically reduce that “and”.

You may contest, “ah, but I can solve this workspace threat issue by making physical desktops, virtual desktops”. This is not the case. We evidenced this in Virtual desktops (VDI) are different, but not hugely better in terms of security, than physical desktops. You do not deliver better security by simply virtualizing the desktop.

So what does vSentry v1.1 bring? How is it better than v1? What can this mean for your organisation?

Continue reading Bromium release vSentry 1.1: trustworthiness for more desktops in the enterprise?

12 Step Program to Enter the Cloud

VirtualizationSecurityOn the 11/29 Virtualization Security Podcast Omar Khawaja the global managing principle at Verizon Terremark Security Solutions joined us to discuss Verizon’s 12 step program for entering the cloud (found on slideshare). This 12 step program concentrates on the IT and Security admins working together with the business to identify all types of data that could be placed into the cloud, and to classify that data. Once this is complete, the next steps are to understand the compliance and security required to protect the data and to access the data. It is a Data Centric approach to moving to the cloud. Continue reading 12 Step Program to Enter the Cloud

Information Superhighway

CloudComputingI can remember back in the day when we connected to the Internet via a modem and were charged by the minute while accessing the Information Superhighway.  Now, the Internet and really, the network it runs on, has pretty much become invisible to the naked eye. Just as we expect the lights to turn on when we flick a switch, we also pretty much expect the Internet to always be on and available without thinking twice about it. Internet service providers have gone from wanting Wi-Fi only in your house to working on providing connectivity to the entire city, giving the metro user Internet access from inside and outside of your home or office. Continue reading Information Superhighway

Threats and Risks in the Cloud

CloudComputingThreats and Risk in the CloudThere are threats to the cloud and there are risks within the cloud. A recent article from Tech Target Search Security blog spurred several thoughts. The main claim here is that there are not enough people who can differentiate threats and risks enough to talk to business leaders who may know very little about security, but do know the business. I have been known to state that there are prominent threats to my data once stored in the cloud and that we should plan to alleviate those threats to reduce our overall risk. But what is the risk?

An analogy comes to mind. Many years ago I ripped my Achilles tendon, and while talking with the doctors they all said that without surgery there was a 50% more likely chance that the Achilles tendon would rip again. So this got me thinking about what they really meant, 50% of what? My next question to the doctors was “how likely is it to fail if I do not have surgery?” Their response was enlightening, there is a 2% failure rate for naturally healed Achilles tendons. Because of that number, I realized that the failure rate for those tendons that undergo surgery is really only 1% vs 2% without. Well that put a different picture on everything. I went without surgery as that particular area of the body has very thin skin, not as much blood flow, and would take a long time to heal from surgery and there was always the risk of picking up something in the hospital, however remote at the time.

So the real question is what is the true risk to an environment if the threat becomes a reality? Continue reading Threats and Risks in the Cloud