SMB Virtualization

SMB Virtualization focuses on delivering the benefits of virtualization to SMB’s, and SME’s in a cost effective and easy to manage manner. SMB Virtualization covers all aspects for virtualization for the SMB or SME starting with hardware and working up the virtualization stack. (Read More)

SMB Virtualization includes use of the technologies that allowed bursting into the cloud for small organizations as well as other cloud services that an SMB or SME could use to perform business operations within virtual or cloud environments. SMB Virtualization concentrates on the smaller scale organizations but while planning for those organizations to grow.

News: Browsium Catalyst Multi-browser Management Tool Released to Beta

Browsium CatalystBrowsium has released Catalyst to public beta. Browsium hopes that Catalyst will transform how organisations manage multi-browser environments.

A browser is a gateway to the Internet, to applications, to data. Many home users have multiple browsers; increasingly many corporations do, too. This might be because different browser versions are needed to maintain access to legacy applications while offering modern access to the Internet. Maybe it is to give users more choice. Maybe it is in an effort to reduce the possibility of a security breach. Maybe it is because users have just installed a second browser because they can. Regardless, managing user use of multiple  browsers—so they are working productively and not bogging down the help-desk—is a complex undertaking.

Browsium, which has developed Browsium Ion to allow management of Internet Explorer, is looking to solve this multi-browser problem with Catalyst.

Continue reading News: Browsium Catalyst Multi-browser Management Tool Released to Beta

Liquidware Labs ProfileUnity v5.2: does it out sense AppSense or haze Mirage?

DesktopVirtualizationLiquidware Labs has released an update to their user environment management product, setting ProfileUnity v5.2 out into the wild. ProfileUnity FlexApp is capable of presenting organisations with a comprehensive user environment management solution encompassing both user virtualization and a virtualized software distribution system. An impressive customer and partner engagement programme has resulted in a growing number of customers who can relate to its straightforward deployment, low acquisition cost, and its ability to manage both user profiles and data and application delivery on demand, in virtualized and physical desktop environments.

We have mentioned before that a commonality between users is their desire to be different. While embracing diversity is a Good Thing, it can be a complex and expensive process in a VDI environment using persistent virtual machines alone. A number of  vendors provide tools to decouple components of user workspaces, to provide for personalisation within a standard environment. This provides cost savings by allowing core standardisation, while reducing the need for the user to change their working practices and allowing them to be as productive as possible. Moreover, few organisations find that a VDI-only solution deals with all of their user use cases – laptops and PCs are still not dead as devices. How do you manage environments across both virtual and physical desktops?

There are more established players in this market. AppSense. RES Software. Indeed VDI vendors are introducing their own solutions. Citrix has incorporated its own Profile Management, Personal vDisks, and has recreated XenClient with their NxTop acquisition. VMware is planning to utilise its Wanova Mirage acquisition to enable IT to centralize PC images of virtual and physical machines and do single image management while users execute locally.

What new features are included Liquidware Labs’ ProfileUnity 5.2, how does it compare against other offerings and differences can it make to your organisation?

Continue reading Liquidware Labs ProfileUnity v5.2: does it out sense AppSense or haze Mirage?

vSTAC R2, Pivot3’s Next Generation VDI Appliance – the sub-$200 desktop virtual desktop is here?

DesktopVirtualizationPivot3 has released its second generation of VDI appliance, looking to make Pivot3 vSTAC R2 simpler to implement and more scalable and to drive further savings than its predecessor. Headline features include utilising VMware View Storage Accelerator, allowing reduced hardware costs; performance increases with more memory and updated processors, allowing greater VM density; and networking options, enabling adoption by a wider SMB market.

We covered Pivot3’s first release about this time last year. If a week is a long time in politics, a year is a generation in IT. In that time, we’ve covered the fact that Pivot3 is not alone; there are  range of appliance makers are looking to simplify VDI adoption.

Pivot3 claims vSTAC VDI R2 can deliver each desktop for the eyebrow raising sum of $165. How are they doing that? Will the improvements help push VDI adoption? Have Pivot solved all of the key questions of VDI appliance makers?

Continue reading vSTAC R2, Pivot3’s Next Generation VDI Appliance – the sub-$200 desktop virtual desktop is here?

News: AppSense DataNow: Anywhere data access that starts in the enterprise

DataNow_logo-300x101AppSense have announced the addition of DataNow Essentials to their User Virtualization Platform. DataNow Essentials is an enterprise data broker solution that gives users anywhere data access from PCs, Macs, tablets, and smartphones using existing IT infrastructure that is fully under the control of the enterprise IT team. The AppSense User Virtualization Platform, already used by some of the world’s largest enterprises to optimize enterprise desktops, now offers broader support for enterprise consumerization and the growing enterprise mobile workforce. Continue reading News: AppSense DataNow: Anywhere data access that starts in the enterprise

OnLive – bad management, or an example of DaaS immaturity?

DesktopVirtualizationOnLive isn’t. As already mentioned, the cloud gaming provider and desktop service provider has ceased to be. Poor budgeting; ridiculous hardware-to-user ratios; low take-up. Quite simply – more money out than in. Ergo, failure  a simple question of finance and poor management.

Nothing to learn here, move on?

Or, can OnLive’s demise give a wider lesson to enterprises? Sure, OnLive were predominantly a games focused company. Yet, the delivery and development of games has driven a lot of technology advances that enterprises use in desktop delivery today: Microsoft’s App-V is software at the heart of desktop virtualisation and was a gaming technology back in the day. Moreover, the concept of any-device access is inherent in range of marketing material from virtual desktop vendors and service providers and also key to pushing game titles to consumers.

But for the better financial planning and an understanding of Microsoft licensing, would OnLive have succeeded? Were they doomed to failure to failure before the off?

What are the key questions you should be looking to have answered from your DaaS service provider?

Continue reading OnLive – bad management, or an example of DaaS immaturity?

Windows Intune 3.0 Microsoft Cloud-based Device Management – More Than Just a Curiosity

DesktopVirtualizationInitial released in March 2011 at the Microsoft Management Summit 2011 in Las Vegas, Windows Intune was Microsoft’s first toe in the water of cloud-based management services for business desktops.  Initial designed to appeal to small to medium-sized companies with up to 500 desktops, it offered a minimal feature set with just the bare bones needed to secure and control basic of desktop services. Nevertheless, there was strong early interest,with all 1,000 test places taken just 24 hrs after the initial public beta was launched in April 2010.  When Microsoft first launched Windows Intune it was easy to misunderstand; combining as it did operating system and application management services, remote support services, and anti-malware services along with a Software Assurance-like Windows upgrade license. As a management solution it was limited, certainly not capable of meeting the needs of more customers with more complex environments. At the same time though it offered sophisticated features that abstracted complexity of managing different operating system releases, and as a cloud-based service it was easy for organizations lacking in skill IT support staff to obtain remote support services from MSPs. Continue reading Windows Intune 3.0 Microsoft Cloud-based Device Management – More Than Just a Curiosity