SMB Virtualization

SMB Virtualization focuses on delivering the benefits of virtualization to SMB’s, and SME’s in a cost effective and easy to manage manner. SMB Virtualization covers all aspects for virtualization for the SMB or SME starting with hardware and working up the virtualization stack. (Read More)

SMB Virtualization includes use of the technologies that allowed bursting into the cloud for small organizations as well as other cloud services that an SMB or SME could use to perform business operations within virtual or cloud environments. SMB Virtualization concentrates on the smaller scale organizations but while planning for those organizations to grow.

Getting SASy, the other shared storage option

By Greg Schulz, Server and StorageIO @storageio

Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) is better known as an interface for connecting hard disk drives (HDD) to servers and storage systems; however it is also widely used for attaching storage systems to physical as well as virtual servers. An important storage requirement for virtual machine (VM) environments with more than one physical machine (PM) server is shared storage. SAS has become a viable interconnect along with other Storage Area Network (SAN) interfaces including Fibre Channel (FC), Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE) and iSCSI for block access.

Various storage options for servers include shared external DAS, networked SAN (iSCSI, FC and now SAS) or network attached storage (NAS such as NFS and Windows CIFS file sharing). In some cases, storage is moving offsite utilizing public or private clouds and managed service provided (MSP) capabilities. Also, it is important to keep in mind that DAS does not have to mean dedicated internal storage; it can also mean external shared direct accessible storage using SAS, iSCSI or Fibre Channel in a point to point topology configuration. Continue reading Getting SASy, the other shared storage option Cloud Trends Report has done a survey of over 500 companies on their cloud and virtualization usage patterns, plans and concerns. The report concludes that in the next 12 months, there will be a fundamental and measurable shift in how companies view and utilize cloud-based solutions. Continue reading Cloud Trends Report

The Beginning of the the End of the Era of Windows?

At VMware’s annual Partner Exchange Conference during his keynote address, Paul Maritz CEO of VMWare said, “One way to look at it is that year there were more copies of Windows or Linux that didn’t touch the hardware than there were that did. This means one of the traditional roles of the operating system, which is to coordinate the underlying hardware, has been taken over by the new layer… a layer that we are collectively laying down. This is the beginning of the end of the era of Windows and Windows centric devices.”

Continue reading The Beginning of the the End of the Era of Windows?

Self Encrypting Disks (SEDs)

By Greg Schulz, Server and StorageIO @storageio

The next true IT industry revolutionary product will be software, virtualization and cloud technology that does not require underlying physical hardware resources (servers, network and disk storage). While we wait for that revolutionary technology to appear outside of marketing or computer generated animations, there remains the need to protect cloud and virtual environments and their underling disk storage. Underlying disk storage includes among others solid state device (SSD) as well hard disk drive (HDD) and Removable Hard Disk Drive (RHDD) packaged in different types of solutions accessed via shared SAS, iSCSI, FC, FCoE or NAS. Continue reading Self Encrypting Disks (SEDs)

Distributed Virtual Switch Failures: Failing-Safe

In my virtual environment recently, I experienced two major failures. The first was with VMware vNetwork Distributed Switch and the second was related to the use of a VMware vShield. Both led to catastrophic failures, that could have easily been avoided if these two subsystems failed-safe instead of failing-closed. VMware vSphere is all about availability, but when critical systems fail like these, not even VMware HA can assist in recovery. You have to fix the problems yourself and usually by hand. Now after, the problem has been solved, and should not recur again, I began to wonder how I missed this and this led me to the total lack of information on how these subsystems actually work. So without further todo, here is how they work and what I consider to be the definition for fail-safe. Continue reading Distributed Virtual Switch Failures: Failing-Safe