SDDC & Hybrid Cloud

Cloud computing has evolved from focusing only on how to construct, secure, manage, monitor, and utilize IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS clouds. As the paradigm matures, it is moving from a pure resource management paradigm to a data and resource management paradigm. (Read More)

SDDC is the next evolution in on-site data center technology. It has taken the knowledge gained from the server virtualization revolution and blended it with software-defined storage and networking to create a data center defined and managed by software running on invisible hardware.

Hybrid Cloud covers the technologies and operational processes, both technical and business, for deploying, consuming, and utilizing this paradigm.

Major areas of focus include barriers to adoption; progress on the part of vendors in removing those barriers; where the lines of responsibility are drawn between the cloud vendor and the customer for IaaS, PaaS, SaaS, and hybrid clouds; and management tools that are essential to deploying and managing the cloud, ensuring its security and the performance of applications.

HPE Discover

HPE had its own little conference called HP Discover this year, in the Excel Center in London. First a little disclaimer. I was invited to attend by Calvin Zito @HPEStorageguy (so thank you for that). That said, it will not affect my independence regarding technology. Now a little aside: one of the oddest things for those of us who are UK based is that even though this was a UK-based conference, we had to use European-to-UK power adapters.

euro_plug
I’m sure we voted for Brexit

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But What about Google?

There has been a lot of buzz this year about Amazon, Microsoft, Citrix, IBM, and VMware, but what about Google? Google has seemed to me to be lacking a clear direction and focus in the way it pursues its business customers. Google has no problems taking care of any and all technical aspects of the business, but it has been missing one of the most important pieces. That piece is a strong, vibrant sales force.

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Technical Certifications: Why and How?

A plethora of certification options are available from Microsoft, Cisco, Citrix, VMware, and other technology companies. Why do people seek technical certifications, and what process does a technology vendor follow in the development of an exam?

Most technology vendors publish charts and graphs that show you will earn a higher salary if you have some of their certifications. In the case of the Cisco CCIE, the company’s grueling top-level certification, that is truly the case, and those who obtain CCIE truly deserve extra-large paychecks.

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Hyperconverged Design: Limit CPU Consumption by Limiting Storage Performance

I am intrigued by the design decisions that are made as products are developed. I find it amazing how often problems are solved in completely different ways in different products. Sometimes these decisions show up when you are not expecting them. I encountered one such example at a vBrownBag TechTalk presentation at the OpenStack Summit in Barcelona last month. The presentation was about deploying OpenStack in multiple telco point of presence (PoP) data centers to deliver NFV. It was a joint presentation between AT&T and Mirantis; you can find the complete video here on YouTube.

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Oracle dip into their pockets again this time for Dyn

Oracle have been quietly building out their next generation cloud environments, building up a cloud practice with seasoned professionals that includes Ex-VCE, VMware and AWS personal.  They have released a completely new version of their IaaS layer cloud. Dipping into their not insignificant loose pocket change to make several key purchases or acquisitions this year.

Now in what should be their last acquisition of 2016 they have now acquired Dyn for an undisclosed amount; but according to Dan Primack, a former senior editor at Fortune it is expected to be in the region of $600million.

oracle_dyn
Oracle acquires Dyn to bolster their Cloud.

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Common Product Security Questions

When investigating the security of various products used on-site, in the cloud, or for clouds, I tend to ask the same set of questions. These focus on identity, compliance, logging, and the like. Specifically, I want to know how the product will integrate with security policy and requirements, as well as with other tools and services in use. Unfortunately, not many pass muster even with regard to these basic questions. Because of this, it is time to define why I ask them, why they are needed, and why you need to consider them as you move forward with your own hybrid cloud products.

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