SDDC & Hybrid Cloud

Cloud computing has evolved from focusing only on how to construct, secure, manage, monitor, and utilize IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS clouds. As the paradigm matures, it is moving from a pure resource management paradigm to a data and resource management paradigm. (Read More)

SDDC is the next evolution in on-site data center technology. It has taken the knowledge gained from the server virtualization revolution and blended it with software-defined storage and networking to create a data center defined and managed by software running on invisible hardware.

Hybrid Cloud covers the technologies and operational processes, both technical and business, for deploying, consuming, and utilizing this paradigm.

Major areas of focus include barriers to adoption; progress on the part of vendors in removing those barriers; where the lines of responsibility are drawn between the cloud vendor and the customer for IaaS, PaaS, SaaS, and hybrid clouds; and management tools that are essential to deploying and managing the cloud, ensuring its security and the performance of applications.

DataCenterVirtualization

The Pleasure and Peril of Comparison Shopping

DataCenterVirtualization

Making decisions about IT infrastructure purchases is hard. There are many interlocked decisions to be made, each of which has multiple requirements. Often, a collection of compromises must occur. For the business project owner with little IT knowledge, it may seem far too complicated. It would be great to have tools that simplify these decisions and reduce the work required to make complicated decisions. It would also be useful to have an independent analysis that supports the decisions made.

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DataCenterVirtualization

Simplification by Policy

DataCenterVirtualization

In previous articles, I suggested that hyperconverged is just a step on a path to simpler IT infrastructure. I also explored how some of the simplification might work. Today, I’d like to explore some of the areas of infrastructure that are ripe for simplification. Some of these areas are already being addressed by some vendors, but no single vendor is addressing every area. I expect that over time, we will see more features become common on all HCI platforms. I also expect that many vendors will retain their own differentiating feature to avoid straight price competition.

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DataCenterVirtualization

Oracle v. HP: Yet Another Rumble in the Jungle for the DB Giant

DataCenterVirtualization

One of the most litigious companies in the valley is Oracle. It is currently in the throes of planning an appeal against a judgement over its Java product.

It is well known that HP and Oracle do not play nice in the corporate playground. Larry Ellison famously stated in 2010 that it would be “virtually impossible” for the two companies to work together in the future. This occurred after HP sued its former CEO Mark Hurd for taking a position as Oracle’s co-president after having resigned, reportedly under pressure from the HP board.

oracle-V-HP

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DataCenterVirtualization

Simplification of IT Infrastructure

DataCenterVirtualization

In a previous article, I suggested that hyperconverged is just a step on a path to simpler IT infrastructure. Before I look at the specific technology areas that I think will become simplified, I’d like to look at how the simplification works. I see simplification coming in two parts. The first is very advanced complexity, in which there is a lot of automated complexity that removes human decision-making. The second is making the required human activities as simple as possible.

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Network Virtualization

On SDN

Network Virtualization
Many of these posts talk about network functions virtualization (NFV) rather than software-defined networking (SDN). NFV is a subset of SDN that is more specific, and it is applicable to a higher level of the application stack. Whereas SDN is aimed at the network layers, NFV is aimed at manipulating the data. The idea of NFV is to take the functions that traditionally would be a part of the network and move them into the compute stack. This move gives us many abilities that we wouldn’t have if the functions remained isolated from the compute. It also lets us move to a much simpler underlying network that is capable of moving traffic around much more quickly. This article aims to examine the different parts that NFV encompasses and to discuss what we gain.

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