Presentation Virtualization

Presentation Virtualization is an application delivery method that delivers users desktops and applications from a shared server, AKA server based computing. This method of delivering applications to users focuses upon running an instance of each Windows desktop operating system application i.e., Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Office for each user on a shared instance of a Windows Server operating system. (Read More)

The most popular product in this category is Citrix XenApp and its predecessors which include Citrix Presentation Server, and Citrix MetaFrame. In the 6.0 releases of its products, Citrix bundled XenApp into XenDesktop. In the 7.0 releases of its products, XenApp has been made available separately again. Microsoft also has a product in this category – Microsoft Remote Desktop Services, but this offering is mostly used in smaller implementations that do not require the enterprise class features that Citrix offers.

Citrix release XenClient Enterprise 4.1: revolution or evolution in desktop virtualisation for laptops

xenclientCitrix’sXenClient Enterprise 4.1 is the first full release since Citrix’s acquisition of Virtual Computer in May. What is new? Is there anything more substantial than a fresh smell of paint? Citrix XenClient had a reputation for being a niche use-case solution, with a limited hardware compatibility list. Does Citrix XenClient 4.1 change that? Citrix’s market dominance has been in delivering remote access to applications  – where does XenClient fit a thinner, desktop-PC-lessening world?

Obviously, I’m not going to sit here and laud it that I was right when Citrix actually did acquire Virtual Computer. Because I also said it’d take 12-18 months for integration and here we are, barely 25% of the way through that and a release is out of the door. Like when you bet on Italy in the final of an international soccer competition sometimes you win, sometimes you lose.

Far more importantly, if you’re considering introducing virtual desktop into your enterprise desktop strategy are client hypervisors a tool to consider? What is the competition for XenClient now that NxTop has been subsumed?

Continue reading Citrix release XenClient Enterprise 4.1: revolution or evolution in desktop virtualisation for laptops

Pano Logic Steals Cloud Client Mantel from Wyse

DesktopVirtualizationThe IT world is forever creating catchy new terms to label technologies in the hope that it will better communicate some vital marketing message. Sometimes this approach works, with few exceptions everybody understands what is meant by “thin client” and “zero client” even when the details of the implementation are wildly different – a Dell Wyse Xenith 2 zero client and a Pano Logic G2M zero client may have widely diverging approaches to delivering a zero configuration plug and play experience, but their appliance-like nature  and operational benefits are the same. Sometimes it doesn’t; regardless of the merit of the technology it describes, type 0 hypervisor  is a term that should be banished from any technical dictionary. And sometimes its too soon to tell. Microvisor is a term used to describe two very different virtualization technologies offered by Bromium and OK Labs that could conceivably compete in the same marketplace at some point in the future. So what about “Cloud Client”? Wikipedia does a good job of defining Cloud Client Continue reading Pano Logic Steals Cloud Client Mantel from Wyse

Does RES Software portfolio update deliver DaaS?

PresentationVirtualizationIf your Desktop-as-a-Service (DaaS) provider is only focused on hosting virtual desktop, they are failing you. If you only provide a desktop environment to your customers – you will annoy them. If a desktop-as-a-service price only includes the cost of standing up a virtual OS instance that offering should be ignored.

To many, DaaS means outsourcing a service to make use of a virtual desktop infrastructure. Yet increasingly, internal IT departments are being encouraged, directly or indirectly, to consider their core desktop provision as a service: not simply “something that just gets done”, like toner cartridge replacement, or fixing the CEO’s son’s friend’s daughter’s laptop; on a Friday; just as you’re going home.

A “desktop service” incorporates many things. The delivery of an operating system environment: but there’s more. The provision of applications. Access to data. Creation of user accounts; the granting of access rights. Access to services such as email, file storage. Understanding what applications are used and when. The ability to print. A desktop service has a range of components that are key to delivering an environment that is reliable and cost effective.

RES Software have recently released a number of updates, new releases and patents that help put the Service into desktop-as-a-service. When considering your own enterprise desktop environment, or enhancing your DaaS offering – what tools are you using to automate delivery? Does the updated RES portfolio assist?

Continue reading Does RES Software portfolio update deliver DaaS?

Ulteo OVD 3 – Open Source Remote Desktop

PresentationVirtualizationUlteo Open Virtual desktop is an Open Source alternative to Presentation Virtualization solutions such as Citrix XenApp, or Ericom PowerConnect or Quest vWorkspace. We looked at Ulteo back in 2009 and that post has consistently featured amongst various top 10 lists of posts on the site.  So we know you are interested but there were limitations in the Version 2 of Ulteo that made it suitable for a only a small number of use-cases. Ulteo have taken our views into account and responded to customer feedback and Ulteo OVD 3 can  now provide a viable alternative in the general marketplace – not just for those enteprises who actively adopt Open Source.

Continue reading Ulteo OVD 3 – Open Source Remote Desktop

StratoDesk enhance offering for converting PCs to ThinClient: NoTouch equals Zero Client?

DesktopVirtualizationComplexity, storage, remoting protocols, device access. There are so many “barriers to VDI adoption”, that you can wonder why people make the effort. Yet, a centralised desktop infrastructure does offer advantages in management, reliability, wider access and (hopefully) proximity to your data: successful business cases can, and are, being made. Less of the piangevole, more of the piacevole.

A common initiator for moving to virtual desktops is the transition away from existing PCs. Despite them still physically capable of powering-on in the morning and working steadily all day, they aren’t up to the heavy lifting that modern operating systems and applications demand: some of you reading may be able to relate on a number of levels. Yet, why refresh those devices as well given those units are now no longer doing the heavy lifting? Many utilise refresh budgets to fund the centralised desktop hardware. A common business case is, the new platform offers a virtuoso performance of business agility over the lentando offering of fixed desktops. However – how do you access these virtual desktops? The Force may well be a binding, metaphysical, and ubiquitous power, but you’re here and now: not a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away.

Yes, it is possible to purchase new devices – which are ever becoming cheaper, faster and better. However “new” is still an expense. Many opt to reduce their initial spend by re-provisioning existing PCs to thin clients.

To help accommodate this option, Stratodesk have announced the latest version of their NoTouch Desktop. NoTouch is a PC and thin-client re-purposing and management product. As well as supporting Citrix, VMware and Quest, Stratodesk have recently partnered with Desktone to offer easier access to Desktone DaaS desktops.

What does Stratodesk’s NoTouch Offer, and can Stratodesk assist in a easing deployment of virtualised desktop projects over and above simply deploying thin clients?
Continue reading StratoDesk enhance offering for converting PCs to ThinClient: NoTouch equals Zero Client?

Dell-Quest deal will strengthen Dell enterprise services and force shakeout in desktop virtualization market

Dell_Circle_100x30According to Bloomberg News Dell is in discussions to acquire Quest Software in a bid to strengthen its enterprise software services portfolio. Dell has been shopping, with five acquisitions announced so far this year, to add software, computer storage and networking gear to its lineup of PCs, which account for 52% of its sales. With PC sales flat and margins thin, Dell has been seeking to broaden its services portfolio and directly challenge HP which has suffered multiple missteps in recent months. Continue reading Dell-Quest deal will strengthen Dell enterprise services and force shakeout in desktop virtualization market