Presentation Virtualization

Presentation Virtualization is an application delivery method that delivers users desktops and applications from a shared server, AKA server based computing. This method of delivering applications to users focuses upon running an instance of each Windows desktop operating system application i.e., Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Office for each user on a shared instance of a Windows Server operating system. (Read More)

The most popular product in this category is Citrix XenApp and its predecessors which include Citrix Presentation Server, and Citrix MetaFrame. In the 6.0 releases of its products, Citrix bundled XenApp into XenDesktop. In the 7.0 releases of its products, XenApp has been made available separately again. Microsoft also has a product in this category – Microsoft Remote Desktop Services, but this offering is mostly used in smaller implementations that do not require the enterprise class features that Citrix offers.

Happy Birthday, Citrix — Now, Get Back to Work

Citrix100x30Citrix is twenty-five this year. It’s done pretty well; not everyone can say that they created a market-defining end user computing platform that is used by every major organization in the world—and a few other places as well.

So Happy Birthday, guys, and please take the rest of the day off. Just make sure you’re in early tomorrow morning.  Continue reading Happy Birthday, Citrix — Now, Get Back to Work

Winds of Change: What Does Horizon 6 Mean for Microsoft and Citrix?

DesktopVirtualizationAt first glance, it looks like VMware’s recently announced Horizon 6 platform is an admission by VMware that applications, rather than desktops, do matter, and that Citrix has been on the right track all along. Certainly, XenApp has been a thorn in the side of many VMware View implementations through the years, allowing people to deliver applications to solve problems that View could only solve by throwing more desktops at them. XenApp has always, for all its problems, offered a simple way to host and distribute applications to a wide variety of user devices.

Continue reading Winds of Change: What Does Horizon 6 Mean for Microsoft and Citrix?

UIAs: Whatever Happened to Them?

ApplicationVirtualizationA couple of years ago, UIAs (user-installed applications) were all the rage. AppSense had a product called StrataApps (and you can do it in Application Manager also), RES has native functionality that allows this, Unidesk can do it (admittedly in a slightly different way with its layering technology), Citrix was pushing Personal vDisk with its acquisition of RingCube—the list goes on. However, the actual use of UIA functionality has been limited, to say the least, and the response to it from IT departments remains frosty at best. Despite predictions that UIA requirements would become an integral part of desktop and (to a lesser extent) server virtualization projects, they seem to have quietly faded away. What happened to the UIAs?  Continue reading UIAs: Whatever Happened to Them?

Ulteo Previews V4.0 of Its Open Virtual Desktop

PresentationVirtualizationUlteo Open Virtual Desktop v4.0 is available for download, with significant enhancements for enterprise deployments and better integration. It offers a flexible presentation virtualization alternative—particularly useful for Linux desktops and also for integration of desktop applications into web-based architectures.

Continue reading Ulteo Previews V4.0 of Its Open Virtual Desktop

Coopetition: Citrix +/- VMware Products and People

DesktopVirtualizationIconIn the virtualization marketplace, when a vendor expands its core business and attempts to grab a piece of the new market from an existing incumbent, the vendors view each other as competitors. In 2007, when Citrix purchased XenSource, VMware vSphere clearly became the enemy, and Citrix envisioned that XenServer + XenApp/XenDesktop would take over the virtual world. That didn’t quite happen. Continue reading Coopetition: Citrix +/- VMware Products and People