Network Virtualization

Network virtualization focuses on how vendors apply the principles of sharing, pooling, abstraction, and configuration to the creation and management of networking resources in the enterprise and cloud. It also examines how moving networking configuration and maintenance affects users who rely on virtualized networking services to support environments and applications.

VMworld US 2015: Day 3 Recap

vmworld2015Welcome to The Virtualization Practice’s week-long coverage of VMworld US 2015. Tune in all week for our daily recap of the major announcements and highlights from the world’s premier virtualization and cloud conference.

VMworld US 2015 continued yesterday, kicked off by the general session. End-User Computing’s Sanjay Poonen led the keynote, in which VMware fleshed out what it means by “any application and any device” within the “Ready for Any” theme of the conference. Beginning with the VMware Workspace Suite, VMware talked at length about the growth of mobile computing and how AirWatch, together with VMware App Volumes, enables IT to manage all Windows 10 devices (physical and virtual, mobile or not), as well as iOS and Android devices, from a single pane of glass. Foreshadowing the next speaker, Poonen wrapped up his portion by talking about the synergies between AirWatch, Horizon, and NSX, with policy settings in NSX affecting and being affected by AirWatch connectivity and data access.

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VMworld US 2015: Day 2 Recap

vmworld2015Welcome to The Virtualization Practice’s week-long coverage of VMworld US 2015. Tune in all week for our daily recap of the major announcements and highlights from the world’s premier virtualization and cloud conference.

VMworld US 2015 continued in force yesterday, beginning with a long but powerful general session/keynote talk. Carl Eschenbach, VMware’s president and COO, set the stage for a slew of announcements around VMware’s “One Cloud, Any Application, Any Device” approach to computing and a seamless federation of all types of clouds, supporting both traditional and new cloud-native applications. A variety of VMware leaders joined him on stage to talk about the various aspects of these announcements and how they mesh with their overall strategy. While each of these areas could give rise a whole series of posts by themselves, I’ll summarize the major points.

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Another Missile Fired in the Cisco vs. VMware SDN War

Network VirtualizationYesterday I was reading about Cisco’s fourth quarter earnings results, as you do when you are bored and waiting for the next episode of EastEnders to start—well, we all have to take a rest from SDN goodness every now and then. Now, this was interesting for two reasons. It was the last quarter under the leadership of big bad John Chambers and the first announced by new head honcho Chuck Robbins (sounds like a cross between a cage fighter and a liberal comedian). Firstly, congratulations are in order on the results—Cisco exceeded analysts’ predictions of $12.6 billion in revenue, with $12.8 billion and a per-share profit of 59 cents, up almost 4% over the previous year, and an overall year-over-year increase of 4%. Continue reading Another Missile Fired in the Cisco vs. VMware SDN War

Choices We Have Plenty: Your Guide to Virtual Switches

DataCenterVirtualizationI was tinkering around with XenServer the other day. I know I can hear you saying “is that a thing?” Well, it is, but this is not what I am going to talk about today. Time for a tangent shift. I thought I would have a look for a third-party switch for XenServer, but it seems that XenServer is a third-rate citizen in this space, as there is no Cisco Nexus 1kV available for XenServer, even though Cisco previewed it at Citrix Synergy Barcelona in 2012.

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Nokia and Alcatel-Lucent Announce Potential Engagement

Network VirtualizationWho knew Nokia was still a thing, after Microsoft bought it? Well, as it turns out, Microsoft only bought the Devices and Services division. Nokia still has a number of other divisions, including NSN (the network infrastructure division), HERE (maps and location-based services), and Advanced Technologies (a licensing and development arm). Microsoft has been paying Nokia a big wedge of cash over the last two years to license Nokia’s HERE services, and the contract extends for at least two more years. For Nokia, getting out of the phone market was an astute move. It had lost the handset war and had moved from a position of dominance to being an also-ran. Its high-end Lumia phones, while nice, weren’t delivering an adequate return on R&D investment when going head to head with the now-dominant Apple and Samsung handsets.

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Managing and Monitoring Performance in SDN / NFV

Network VirtualizationWe have all drunk the Kool-Aid. Software-defined networking (SDN), network functions virtualization (NFV), or both will save the world. They decouple us from the shackles of legacy networks to allow a utopia of business-driven requirements to freely flow, delivering value and freeing the network, application, storage, and infrastructure teams to have weekends off and time with their families.

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