IT as a Service

IT as a Service (ITaaS) covers private clouds hybrid clouds and the cloud management offerings used to create and manage these clouds. This includes coverage of Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) private and hybrid cloud offerings, Platform as a Service (PaaS) private and hybrid cloud offerings, and Software as a Service (SaaS). (Read More)

Emerging areas like Desktop as a Service (DaaS), Storage as a Service, and Applications as a Service are also covered. The key issues covered include which enterprise applications and use cases are appropriate for private and hybrid clouds, and how vendors should select the cloud management offerings that are going to be used to manage these various types of cloud services. Covered vendors include VMware (vCloud Automation Center), VirtuStream, CloudBolt Software, Intigua, ElasticBox, ServiceMesh, Cloudsidekick, and Puppet Labs.

And then there were three – NxTop Enterprise morphs to XenClient Enterprise

DesktopVirtualizationLike waking up from a scene in a night’s dream where you were on a lovely walk, to find yourself stood outside of your now locked hotel room wearing nothing but your underwear, NxTop customers and resellers may well view the purchase of Virtual Computer by Citrix with a chill, heart-quickening, “right then, what next”?

Virtual Computer’s free offerings are no longer available, NxTop Enterprise edition gets a modest per user price increase. Support is still available. It is likely any road-map will take a wobble. What is now XenClient Enterprise is one of three client hypervisor versions that are offered by the application delivery leader who was, up until Friday, ‘the investing competition’.

Virtual Computer was a leader in the Type I client hypervisor delivery platform: although to be fair, it wasn’t a big race card.  In comparison to its cousin XenClient, at technical level it had better instance management options, a pre-packaged virtual machine instance with Chrome and Citrix Receiver, far wider hardware support and integrated systray tools within Microsoft Windows VMs. The latest 4.0.6 released earlier this month, continued  a steady improvement in management options for configurations. More importantly for the enterprise – Virtual Computer had the better links than the with hardware manufacturers with a strategy to integrate new hardware releases in weeks rather than months. Perhaps most interestingly, NxTop was highlighted as an solution that strongly aligned with Intel’s Intelligent Desktop Virtualisation (IDV).

VDI too expensive? VDI too remote? Have you considered IDV – manage centrally, run locally?

Yet despite innovation awards, the client-side hypervisor leader found it hard to gain momentum. Talking to CIO/CTOs the technology and you come across a number of obstacles in new accounts. Where does it fit with a BYOD strategy? What advantage does it offer over solutions such as LANDesk, Dells’ KACE or Microsoft’s SCCM? Will it run on a Mac? How does it deliver to my tablet?

The integration time for XenClient Enterprise likely to be 12-18 months. If you’re running  NxTop now, how will that impact your roll-out or continued delivery?  If you dismissed XenClient and went XenDesktop – should you stop? How could Citrix accommodate a product that can be pitched directly against XenDesktop and VDI-in-a-box? Why and will Citrix embrace IDV?

Continue reading And then there were three – NxTop Enterprise morphs to XenClient Enterprise

VMware Advances End User Computing Vision with View, Horizon and Personal Cloud Updates

VMware100x30Kind to come just one week before the Citrix Synergy conference in San Francisco, VMware announced the next step towards its vision for End User Computing today by unveiling the latest updates to VMware View and Horizon Application manager, as well as  sharing more news about its Project Octopus beta. Continue reading VMware Advances End User Computing Vision with View, Horizon and Personal Cloud Updates

Desktone v5 angling to hook Service Providers from Citrix’s FlexCast

desktone100x30Just in case Citrix doesn’t have anything to talk about next week at their San Francisco Synergy, Desktone release v5.0 of their Desktop-As-A-Service platform. Previous releases focused on delivering a VDI environment (i.e. instances of hosted desktop  OSes): with the v5.0 release, Desktone have architected a platform to allow resellers and service providers to deliver and support heterogeneous end user-environments. With a  Desktone v5 platform, it is possible to deliver:

•    Hosted Full-Featured VDI:  to allow delivery of a desktop OS that replicates the experience of a physical Windows or Linux desktop. Continue reading Desktone v5 angling to hook Service Providers from Citrix’s FlexCast

News: VMTurbo Delivers End-To-End Automated Service Assurance

VMTurboVMTurbo is the only vendor offering automated service assurance in the virtualization ecosystem today. Automated service assurance means that you identify the applications that are the most important to you (and the ones that are not), you  assign them budgets of virtual resources, and VMTurbo ensures that the service level of the most important applications is not negatively impacted by the resource requirements of less important applications or workloads. Continue reading News: VMTurbo Delivers End-To-End Automated Service Assurance

On Premise vs. Monitoring as a Service – Considerations and Tradeoffs

PerformanceManagementWe all pretty much know that we can buy Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), Development/Run time Platforms as a Service (PaaS), Software as a Service (Saas), Security as a Service, Cloud Storage as a Service, among other things – but we can also buy monitoring as a service. We can buy monitoring at both the infrastructure level and the application level as a service. This is an intriguing idea, and one that is rapidly gaining traction. However Monitoring as a Service (MaaS) carries with it some unique benefits, but it also carries with it some trade-offs especially when evaluated against on-premise solutions. Continue reading On Premise vs. Monitoring as a Service – Considerations and Tradeoffs

News: VMware Acquires Cetas for Big Data Analytics

On Thursday April 26 VMware announced that it has acquired Cetas, an early stage startup focused upon making access to advanced big data analytics much easier and cheaper. The obvious goal of this is that if you make something easier and cheaper, more of it gets consumed, which then allows more people to benefit from it. 25 years ago, mobile phones were expensive, the size of shoe boxes, and few people could afford to buy them and bother to use them. We all know how ubiquitous mobile phones are now, and this is entirely due to the democratization and commoditization of mobile phone access.

What Does Cetas Do?

Cetas makes it easy to apply advanced self-learning complex event processing technology to random sets of data. Furthermore it is built from the ground up to handle “big data” which means that it is designed to handle large data sets, large amounts of rapidly arriving data, and data that arrives at high rates of frequency (at or near real time rates).  VMware thinks that Cetas is good for three primary uses cases shown in the diagram below.

Cetas.Use .Cases

There are two very interesting problems that VMware could potentially address with Cetas. The first is that doing analytics at cloud scale (think of trying to analyze data about every virtual server at Amazon at the same time) is clearly a big data problem, and a challenging problem purely on the front of making the analytics work and be easy to use with data sets of that size.

The second has to do with Operational Performance and Application Performance data. Right now VMware collects data from its hypervisor at 20 second intervals and rolls that up into 5 minute intervals for access via the vSphere API. These intervals are too long, and the rollups obscure too much data, but until now VMware has not had any way to analyze the data to make it more useful. Cetas therefore can potentially solve problems that apparently the Integrien technology that VMware purchased a couple of years ago is not suited to address.

How is Cetas Deployed

Cetas is available as a cloud resident service (analytics as a service), or as an on-premise solution.



When we look back five years from now, we will probably conclude that the Cetas acquisition was one of the most significant acquisitions that VMware did. The Cetas technology is going to bring real time self-learning analytics to several layers of VMware’s management offerings over time. As soon as VMware gets into the business of producing and analyzing real time, continuous and deterministic management data the final nail will be driven in the legacy management solutions that sample and operate at 5 minute intervals.