IT as a Service

IT as a Service (ITaaS) covers private clouds hybrid clouds and the cloud management offerings used to create and manage these clouds. This includes coverage of Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) private and hybrid cloud offerings, Platform as a Service (PaaS) private and hybrid cloud offerings, and Software as a Service (SaaS). (Read More)

Emerging areas like Desktop as a Service (DaaS), Storage as a Service, and Applications as a Service are also covered. The key issues covered include which enterprise applications and use cases are appropriate for private and hybrid clouds, and how vendors should select the cloud management offerings that are going to be used to manage these various types of cloud services. Covered vendors include VMware (vCloud Automation Center), VirtuStream, CloudBolt Software, Intigua, ElasticBox, ServiceMesh, Cloudsidekick, and Puppet Labs.

How Will VMware Win Against Microsoft?

DataCenterVirtualizationWhile VMware is still the undisputed leader in enterprise data center virtualization, it is also very obvious that Microsoft has made (and continues to make) significant inroads into both the broader data center virtualization market and into VMware’s own enterprise customer base. The general perception is that Microsoft Hyper-V is now “good enough” to run most production workloads, that it is close enough (or at parity) in functionality and performance to vSphere for customers to be able to move workloads from vSphere to Hyper-V, and that vSphere is “expensive” and Hyper-V is “free”. So how will VMware win against Microsoft? Continue reading How Will VMware Win Against Microsoft?

OpenStack and the Software Defined Data Center (SDDC)

OpenStack Logoopenstack-cloud-software-vertical-smallThe OpenStack Summit this week continued to fan the flames of the software-defined data center. The software-defined data center is just a term for replacing traditional data center hardware functionality with the same features implemented in software, running on commodity x86 servers. While software-defined approaches to data center features are at least nominally less expensive than their hardware counterparts the real promise in the approach is flexibility and management ease with high levels of integration. Reconfiguring a network to support the security requirements of a new application is now just a function of  software and APIs. Expanding storage is just simply adding another node with more storage attached, and the cluster compensates automatically. Even things like firewall rules and load balancer configurations can now be stored as templates along with the applications, to be provisioned in minutes. Continue reading OpenStack and the Software Defined Data Center (SDDC)

News: GoGrid and Racemi Start the Cloud Onboarding Arms Race

CloudComputingEvery public cloud vendor looks longingly at all of the virtualized workloads running in VMware based data centers owned by enterprises worldwide, and says, “if only we could migrate those workloads to our cloud”. Of course this dream on the part of all of the public cloud vendors is VMware’s nightmare.  Now GoGrid has announced a partnership with Racemi that allows customers to migrate their workloads from any physical or virtual server platform to the GoGrid cloud. Continue reading News: GoGrid and Racemi Start the Cloud Onboarding Arms Race

SDDC and the Ever Expanding Control Plane

ITasaServiceThe software defined data center has the potential to expand the control plane well outside of anyone’s control by the simple fact that we do not yet have a unified control mechanism for disparate hardware (networking, storage, and compute), for disparate hypervisors (vSphere, KVM, Xen, Hyper-V), new types of hypervisors (storage and networking), and new ideas at managing SDDC at scale. These all end up on the control plane of a software defined data center. In addition, we cross multiple trust zones while in that control plane such as going from user controlled portals to hypervisor management constructs. Add to this the ever increasing number of APIs and we have a very hard to secure environment. Continue reading SDDC and the Ever Expanding Control Plane

Virtualization News for 4/1/2013

April FoolsThe following important events and vendor/organization announcements have occurred today 4/1/2013:

  1. VMware announced the intention to become a hypervisor only company, and announced therefore that they were shedding all non-core assets including the end user/mobile division, the hybrid cloud division, and the management software division.
  2. Intel announced that they will implement the hypervisor in the next generation of their X86 server platform chips, making software hypervisors completely unnecessary. Intel further announced that the Atom chip is its future strategic chip architecture
  3. Dell announced that they have ported the now unnecessary VMware hypervisor to the Atom chipset and will be using this chipset in all future desktop, server, laptop, tablet and phone offerings
  4. Microsoft announced that it is abandoning Windows, will adopt open source Ubuntu as its strategic operating system, will cease all further development on Windows, will port all products and services that used to only run on Windows to Ubuntu and will adopt the open source KVM hypervisor as its future virtualization layer.
  5. EMC announced that “the day of storage virtualization is here”. EMC further announced that it was abandoning its hardware storage business and would now only sell storage virtualization software at a price of $1 per terabyte per year.
  6. The US Federal Government announced that due to its previous investment in legacy and now worthless IT hardware and software assets that it was declaring bankruptcy in order to remove these now worthless assets from its balance sheet. The US government further announced that it would be using Amazon EC2 for all future computing needs.
  7. Amazon announced that due to demand from the government for its services, it would no longer offer commercial customers any kind of an SLA.
  8. Amazon’s commercial customers cheered this move as  recognition of the fact that Amazon’s SLA’s were worthless in the first place.
  9. CA, IBM, and BMC announced that they are finally abandoning their mainframe systems management software businesses to focus entirely upon Intel X86 based systems software just as Intel announced the move from X86 to Atom- ensuring another 20 year legacy systems management software revenue stream for CA, IBM and BMC.
  10. Adobe announced a digital signature program for PDF files ensuring that customers would never have to print a PDF, sign it, scan it and then email it again.
  11. HP announced that it was going to go “back to its roots” and become just a vendor of printers. HP then announced that it was acquiring Adobe so that it could become the market leader in the printing of the PDF files that Adobe just said would never have to be printed again.
  12. Bill Gates fired Steve Ballmer as the CEO of Microsoft and replaced Steve with himself in this role. Gates then decided to focus Microsoft entirely upon improving the primary and secondary educational system in America and told every Microsoft employee to get a job as a teacher or else they would not get paid.
  13. Steve Ballmer decided to start a new professional sports league focused upon the throwing of chairs.
  14. Veeam announced that it has backed up all of the data in the world, making further backups of any other data unnecessary.
  15. Splunk announced that it has indexed all of the data in the world that Veeam backed up and announced that its future business model was a fee of $1 for each query against that database.
  16. Google announced that it now knows everything about every person in the world that it needs to know. Google further announced that it would open source this data store so that no one could accuse Google of “doing evil”.
  17. Paul Maritz’s new company, The Pivotal Initiative announced a point and click application development interface that allows any code monkey anywhere in the world to develop any desired big data application against the respective data stores of Veeam, Splunk and Google in less than one hour.
  18. Cisco announced that it was abandoning the switch hardware and router hardware businesses and would now be only a vendor of software defined switches and routers at a cost of $1 per software switch and router port per year.
  19. New Relic announced that it was changing its name to Byru, an anagram of Ruby which replaces New Relic which is an anagram of Lew Cirne the founder of New Relic. The company stated that this new name was designed to broaden the appeal of the company beyond the initial 36,000 customers who are personal fans of Lew Cirne.
  20. AppDynamics announced that it was changing its name of StaticApps, because it has discovered that moving applications around hurts their response time and performance.
  21. VMTurbo announced that it has exhumed the body of Milton Friedman, put his brain through a CAT scan, and discovered an algorithm that perfectly allocates IT resources to their highest and best uses across all customers and providers in the world based upon global supply and demand curves.
  22. SolarWinds announced that they were changing the name of the company to MoonWinds, because there are no winds on the moon, in the hope of eliminating all of the barriers to the sale of their products.
  23. ManageEngine announced that they were exiting the business of managing computer systems so as to focus fully on the brand equity of the “Engine” in their product name. The new company will be called CarEngine, and will allow you to manage the engine of your car from your smartphone.
  24. AppSense announced that having virtualized the user, that the next frontier was to virtualize the significant others of every user in their installed base. However AppSense discovered that abstracting users from each other did not generate any revenue other than in the case of impending divorces, which turned AppSense into a law firm that advertises on television.
  25. All of the software start-ups in Silicon Valley who did not want to own servers decided to buy coffee makers with Intel X86 processors, creating a “shadow IT” server infrastructure in these software start ups.
  26. IBM, CA and BMC announced a growth strategy of managing these new farms of X86 server based coffee makers.


April Fools 2013. Nothing in this post is true. If anything in this post becomes true then we are all fools for not foreseeing it.

Client Hypervisors: Intelligent Desktop Virtualization too clever for its own good?

DesktopVirtualizationIn 2011, we asked if  Client Hypervisors will drive will the Next Generation Desktop. Yet, other desktop virtualization industry experts, such as Ron Oglesby, decided the technology was a dead man walking, writing off Type 1 Client  Hypervisors.

Fight? Fight? Fight?

While VMware moved away from client hypervisors, they had to agree that an end user compute device strategy must encompass non-VDI. Their Mirage technology can be considered desktop virtualization, but it is not a client hypervisor. Client hypervisor vendors such as Citrix (who subsumed Virtual Computer’s NxTop) , MokaFive, Parallels, Virtual Bridges and joined by Zirtu. Organisations like  WorldView look to innovate on desktop vitualization through containers rather than full virtualization.

Tablets. Touch Screen capable laptops. Hybrid devices with detachable screens. The netbook might be dead, or they could just be resting. The presence of tablets has undeniably shaken the netbook market but businesses still need powerful, capable laptops.

Bring Your Own Pencil aside – there is still a need to manage “stuff”: still large and small organisations who need to manage the delivery of IT including the end device. The question remains how are devices, and the all important data and applications on them, managed? Hosted and session based desktops have their place – but offline capable device requirements will remain.  Is Intelligent Desktop Virtualization the same as client hypervisors?

Continue reading Client Hypervisors: Intelligent Desktop Virtualization too clever for its own good?