IT as a Service

IT as a Service (ITaaS) covers private clouds, hybrid clouds, and on-premises clouds, as well as cloud management, including performance management offerings used to create and manage these entities. Consider this IT consumption as a utility. (Read More)

This topic explores Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) private and hybrid cloud offerings, Platform as a Service (PaaS) private and hybrid cloud offerings, and Software as a Service (SaaS). It also investigates emerging areas such as Desktop as a Service (DaaS), Storage as a Service, and Applications as a Service.

The key areas covered include enterprise applications and use cases that are appropriate for private and hybrid clouds, and how consumers and vendors should select cloud management offerings they will use to manage the various types of cloud services and the journey to the cloud: from A to Z and all points between.

Predictive Analytics and False Positives

We are in the midst of an analytics boom. Everywhere I look, I see analytics presented as the answer to everything from sweaty pores to security. They may even improve hair growth. That aside, analytics truly are invading everything we do. There are three types of analytics. Over reliance on any one type leaves businesses vulnerable to false positives. IT lives in the land of false positives. We disable and ignore seemingly false alerts, but are they really false? How can we gain more from our analytics?

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Is the GUI the Enemy of Automation?

In IT there is not simply more than one way to skin a cat. There are multiple philosophies describing the methods. Most of these philosophies are based on preference and history, and on how, where, and when we learn, but not so much on what is necessarily the best way. Much of the how and when is linked to cycles that seem to permeate the industry: cycles of ideas that surface, are used, are bettered, and eventually resurface.

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Comparison: IT as a Service Event Management

Part of any IT management platform is the handling of events, whether that is aggregating external events, creating its own events, or passing those events on to others. There seems to be a common set of criteria for those events. So, let us look into these common criteria for handling events and compare some of the vendors in the space.

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Where Is My Operations Swamp-Drain-O-Matic?

As SF author William Gibson said, “The future is already here—it’s just not very evenly distributed.” Some IT infrastructure teams live in a future where they are resolving every issue before there are problems for end users. These teams live in a nirvana where help-desk tickets are all requesting new accounts to be created for staff who start work next week. Phone calls bring praise from line-of-business managers. Personally, I have never seen these IT teams. Maybe they exist; maybe they are just a dream. Many IT infrastructure teams work in a very different world: a world of hurt and pain, where application performance is unpredictable. The help-desk call queue sometimes spirals out of control. When the team is this deep in alligators, it can be hard to see how to drain the swamp. A crucial first step is getting the lay of the land and some idea of where the problems are coming from. The next step is to start dealing with the root causes of issues before they cause problems.

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IT Governance: Notes from the Field

A critical factor in achieving speed of execution is being clear about who gets to make which decisions. Governance is about establishing a framework to ensure that all decisions are made by the right person or persons, according to the importance of the decision and the expertise and organizational responsibilities of the parties to the decision. Decisions with large financial impact must be made by senior managers as part of an ongoing management process, while those with lesser impact are more efficiently made by those who are accountable for executing the decisions.

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Pulling from vs. Pushing to the Cloud

Ask anyone if they have adopted the cloud, and the answer will likely be yes. Whether it’s Microsoft Office 365, Salesforce.com, Google Docs, Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, or any of the myriad other cloud services, almost everyone will cheerfully admit to using the cloud in some form. Does the definition of cloud imply pulling from cloud services, workloads pushing to the cloud, or perhaps both?

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