Desktop Virtualization

Desktop Virtualization covers VDI (centrally hosted desktops), Desktops as a Service (DaaS), desktop virtualization via client side hypervisors, and shared server technologies. Major areas of focus include when and where centralized desktop offerings are appropriate and not appropriate, (Read More)

how management of remote desktops combined with management of mobile devices leads to a better managed and more productive end user computing environment, how to deliver the performance that end users require, and the impacts of using remote desktop technologies upon organizational security. Covered products and vendors include the VMware Horizon Suite, Horizon View, Horizon Mirage, VMware ThinApp, Citrix XenServer, Citrix XenApp, Citrix XenClient, and Microsoft Remote Data Services.

Citrix Beats Earnings — Still Cuts

citrix100x30Citrix released its Q4 2014 earnings last Wednesday, handily beating Wall Street expectations by reporting earnings of $1.10 cents per share on revenues of $851 million, up six percent on the same quarter in 2013, against Wall Street expectations of $1.03 cents per share on revenue of $844 million on both counts. At the same time, Citrix announced a restructuring program that will see 700 employees and a further 200 contractors losing their jobs. This restructuring also sees the end of VDI-in-a-Box, the all-in-one VDI platform that it acquired with Kaviza in 2010. Continue reading Citrix Beats Earnings — Still Cuts

Desktop Hypervisors in 2015

DesktopVirtualizationFour and a half years ago, I wrote an article exploring the competition between Citrix and VMware in the desktop hypervisors space: Citrix and VMware face-off over client hypervisors. Citrix had just released XenDesktop 4.0 Feature Pack 2, which introduced XenClient as a bundled component in XenDesktop. One month earlier, at VMworld, VMware had broken the glass ceiling separating VMware from Citrix with View 4.5. Continue reading Desktop Hypervisors in 2015

Managing Legacy Java Versions

ApplicationVirtualizationJava is currently the leading exploit vector for Windows machines, and Java vulnerabilities are packaged into many of the “exploit kits” available in the darker corners of the Internet (see http://krebsonsecurity.com/2010/10/java-a-gift-to-exploit-pack-makers/). Internet Explorer, Flash Player, and even the Windows operating system itself have done a good job of either improving the security of their products or improving their patching processes. Java, however, still lags noticeably behind in both user/media awareness and quality of code. According to some statistics, Java vulnerabilities account for up to 70% of successful exploits, making it a veritable nightmare from a security perspective.

Continue reading Managing Legacy Java Versions

Project VRC “State of the VDI and SBC Union 2015” Survey

DesktopVirtualizationFor the last five years, Ruben Spruijt (@rspruijt) and Jeroen van de Kamp (@TheJeroen), two of the leading lights in the desktop and application virtualization market, have been working together on an independent R&D project, Virtual Reality Check (VRC). Together with Login VSI, they have published in-depth studies detailing the performance of application virtualization solutions and best practices for implementing them. Those they have examined use different hypervisors, Windows operating systems, Microsoft Office versions, and antivirus packages in server hosted desktop solutions. In doing so, Spruijt and van de Kamp have created one of the most valuable bodies of knowledge available to anyone looking to implement server-based computing and VDI systems.

Continue reading Project VRC “State of the VDI and SBC Union 2015” Survey