Desktop Virtualization

Desktop Virtualization covers VDI (centrally hosted desktops), Desktops as a Service (DaaS), desktop virtualization via client side hypervisors, and shared server technologies. Major areas of focus include when and where centralized desktop offerings are appropriate and not appropriate, (Read More)

how management of remote desktops combined with management of mobile devices leads to a better managed and more productive end user computing environment, how to deliver the performance that end users require, and the impacts of using remote desktop technologies upon organizational security. Covered products and vendors include the VMware Horizon Suite, Horizon View, Horizon Mirage, VMware ThinApp, Citrix XenServer, Citrix XenApp, Citrix XenClient, and Microsoft Remote Data Services.

VDI Security – better than physical desktops?

VirtualizationSecurityAre virtualised desktops – be they hosted desktops (VDI) or session desktops (RDSH)  more secure than physical?  We’ve questioned before the benefits of a virtual desktop infrastructure with respect to security. Is VDI secure? Is VDI inherently more secure than “traditional desktops”? In our article Virtual Desktop Security? Are They Secure? We considered VDI vendor claims that there are several big virtual desktop security wins:

Teradici to announce RDSH solution at VMworld San Francisco

DesktopVirtualizationTeradici today pulled back the curtain on a major new initiative, pre-announcing plans to introduce a new Remote Desktop Services Host (RDSH) solution later this year. Signaling that it is no longer content to focus exclusively on its PC over IP remote display protocol, instead looking to broaden its outlook as a provider of end to end remote desktop services. Continue reading Teradici to announce RDSH solution at VMworld San Francisco

Citrix release XenClient Enterprise 4.1: revolution or evolution in desktop virtualisation for laptops

xenclientCitrix’sXenClient Enterprise 4.1 is the first full release since Citrix’s acquisition of Virtual Computer in May. What is new? Is there anything more substantial than a fresh smell of paint? Citrix XenClient had a reputation for being a niche use-case solution, with a limited hardware compatibility list. Does Citrix XenClient 4.1 change that? Citrix’s market dominance has been in delivering remote access to applications  – where does XenClient fit a thinner, desktop-PC-lessening world?

Obviously, I’m not going to sit here and laud it that I was right when Citrix actually did acquire Virtual Computer. Because I also said it’d take 12-18 months for integration and here we are, barely 25% of the way through that and a release is out of the door. Like when you bet on Italy in the final of an international soccer competition sometimes you win, sometimes you lose.

Far more importantly, if you’re considering introducing virtual desktop into your enterprise desktop strategy are client hypervisors a tool to consider? What is the competition for XenClient now that NxTop has been subsumed?

Continue reading Citrix release XenClient Enterprise 4.1: revolution or evolution in desktop virtualisation for laptops

Pano Logic Steals Cloud Client Mantel from Wyse

DesktopVirtualizationThe IT world is forever creating catchy new terms to label technologies in the hope that it will better communicate some vital marketing message. Sometimes this approach works, with few exceptions everybody understands what is meant by “thin client” and “zero client” even when the details of the implementation are wildly different – a Dell Wyse Xenith 2 zero client and a Pano Logic G2M zero client may have widely diverging approaches to delivering a zero configuration plug and play experience, but their appliance-like nature  and operational benefits are the same. Sometimes it doesn’t; regardless of the merit of the technology it describes, type 0 hypervisor  is a term that should be banished from any technical dictionary. And sometimes its too soon to tell. Microvisor is a term used to describe two very different virtualization technologies offered by Bromium and OK Labs that could conceivably compete in the same marketplace at some point in the future. So what about “Cloud Client”? Wikipedia does a good job of defining Cloud Client Continue reading Pano Logic Steals Cloud Client Mantel from Wyse

Defense in Depth: Storage Security in a Hybrid Cloud

StorageNetworkingStorage Security is not only about Encryption, which is just one aspect of Storage Security requirements for the virtual and cloud environments. It is also about increasing defense in depth and knowledge of what is touching your storage environment. As well as providing security around those touch points and to a great extent auditing and protecting the data residing within the storage devices regardless of where the devices live: within the virtual environment or within a cloud. Traditionally we have the following storage security capabilities: