Desktop Virtualization

Desktop Virtualization covers VDI (centrally hosted desktops), Desktops as a Service (DaaS), desktop virtualization via client side hypervisors, and shared server technologies. Major areas of focus include when and where centralized desktop offerings are appropriate and not appropriate, (Read More)

how management of remote desktops combined with management of mobile devices leads to a better managed and more productive end user computing environment, how to deliver the performance that end users require, and the impacts of using remote desktop technologies upon organizational security. Covered products and vendors include the VMware Horizon Suite, Horizon View, Horizon Mirage, VMware ThinApp, Citrix XenServer, Citrix XenApp, Citrix XenClient, and Microsoft Remote Data Services.

The Software Defined Data Center and VDI

DesktopVirtualizationIn this GigaOm article, Steve Herrod, the CTO of VMware, explained, “Software defined data centers are “generation-proof.” They collapse disparate systems into a singularity built atop commodity x86 processors and other gear. Software provides everything that is needed to adapt the data center to new situations and new applications, and to manage everything from storage to switches to security. Although VMware will always work with hardware partners, Herrod said, “If you’re a company building very specialized hardware … you’re probably not going to love this message.” Continue reading The Software Defined Data Center and VDI

Oracle and VMware Update Desktop Virtualization Platforms

DesktopVirtualizationOracle and VMware have both been busy with their respective desktop-focused type II hypervisors, with each vendor releasing updates in the last month.  Focus on Microsoft’s upcoming Windows 8 and Windows server 2012 is inevitable, but that aside both vendors continue to drive their respective products in clearly defined directions with no real regard for competition. Oracle’s updates to VirtualBox have added significantly to its appeal, but leave it trailing behind VMware Workstation in both its finish and feature count. While VMware has done much to optimize Workstation to work with the forthcoming Windows 8, many of the other updates that VMware has released could be thought of as gilding the lily, offering features such as Thumbnail Actions that allow virtual machine power state to be controlled from the taskbar. Continue reading Oracle and VMware Update Desktop Virtualization Platforms

Bromium vSentry a Next Generation Hypervisor to End Malware Woes?

VirtualizationSecurityDesktop security start-up Bromium announced the general availability of vSentry, at the Gartner Security and Risk Management management Summit in London today. Their first product to be based on the Bromium Microvisor designed to protect from advanced malware that attacks the enterprise through poisoned attachments, documents and websites.

Continue reading Bromium vSentry a Next Generation Hypervisor to End Malware Woes?

Appliance Makers Simplify VDI Adoption

DesktopVirtualizationVDI is expensive and complicated; at least it used to be. Cost is no longer the issue that it was with the cost of data center hardware falling from over $1,000 per desktop a couple of years ago to a fraction of the cost of a budget PC today. Complexity however has been rising as multiple third-party components have been integrated into the mix to bring the price down. As cost falls so VDI becomes more attractive especially to budget conscious SMB customers, at the same time though as complexity has increased, the willingness and ability of these new customers to successfully deploy and maintain VDI has fallen. This has proven to be a boon for DaaS providers who can abstract the complexity of VDI behind a simple to consumer service, and are as a consequence seeing significant increase in traction. Continue reading Appliance Makers Simplify VDI Adoption

Microsoft Windows 2012 RDSH vs Citrix XenApp – PV to get its own Murderball?

PresentationVirtualizationThere is a pervasive question for Presentation Virtualisation using Remote Desktop Session Host services (RDSH) and that is  :-

if I’m already paying for RDS CALs and running the base OS, why do I need other stuff?

Where stuff is, typically, Citrix XenApp. With the release of Windows 2012 and the updates to RDSH do you still need Citrix XenApp?

I was introduced to many new sports over the summer and one sport that stuck in the mind, not only for it sheer fury and skill, was wheelchair rugby (or Quad rugby). Or as the Canadian inventors, named it – Murderball.

A key elements of the sport – it is a fast and very competitive exchange.

Your ball you say? I think not.
Picture from

Sneaking into August, like an American multi-gold medallist back from a celebratory night out on the champagne, Microsoft’s Windows 2012 boasts a wide array of new features. Hyper-V’s improvement are worthy of a post in themselves: live migration, teaming of 32 NICs, thin provisioning, dynamic memory. For now, we’ll focus on the updates to Remote Desktop Service’s Session Host updates.

With new and improved functions in Remote Desktop Services in Windows 2012, how competitive is the exchange? Is it worth murdering a ball for?

Continue reading Microsoft Windows 2012 RDSH vs Citrix XenApp – PV to get its own Murderball?