Cloud Computing

Cloud Computing focuses upon how to construct, secure, manage, monitor and use public IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS clouds. Major areas of focus include barriers to cloud adoption, progress on the part of cloud vendors in removing those barriers, where the line of responsibility is drawn between the cloud vendor and the customer for each of IaaS, PaaS and SaaS clouds, (Read More)

as well as the management tools that are essential to deploy in the cloud, ensure security in the cloud and ensure the performance of applications running in the cloud. Covered vendors include Amazon, VMware, AFORE, CloudSidekick, CloudPhysics, ElasticBox, Hotlink, New Relic, Prelert, Puppet Labs and Virtustream.

Datasores: Where are yours?

VirtualizationBackupA typo report on twitter has lead me to a set of thoughts with respect to data. Where are your Datasores? What is a datasore? Unlike a Data Store which holds data, a datasore is a place where data becomes either painful to manage or protect. Or where the data exceeds your capability to handle it. A data sore should never happen, but with the explosion of data being moved, protected, managed, and mined we have exceeded certain limits of our existing set of tools. How do we find data sores and alleviate them? Does alleviating them require us to re-architect our entire data usage and storage mechanisms? Continue reading Datasores: Where are yours?

Are We Missing a Category of Cloud Computing?

CloudComputingSome time ago, categories of public cloud computing were established. First of all, a distinction was created on who owned the cloud, with private (it is yours), hybrid (you are renting it, but not sharing it with anyone), and public (you are renting it, and you are sharing the infrastructure with an unknown number and type of other entities) having been defined. Then we created Infrastructure-as-a-Service – IaaS (a service consisting of either the container for the OS, or the container and the OS in it), Platform-as-a-Service – PaaS (a service consisting of IaaS plus all of the application services (web server, application server, database server, and language run times) that an application needs, and Software -as-a-Service – SaaS (the entire application is delivered over the Internet, typically by the application vendor ( being a good example). Continue reading Are We Missing a Category of Cloud Computing?

Data in the Cloud: Does Information want to be Free?

CloudComputingAt a dinner party recently, I was asked “does information want to be free?” This question is based on information that exists within the cloud today or tomorrow: Data in the Cloud. It is an interesting question with a fairly ready answer. Information is Power, it is people not information that controls information. Granted we have a massive abundance of information within the cloud today, is it trying to be free, or are people trying to make it free to everyone? In addition, is all this information even true or accurate? Continue reading Data in the Cloud: Does Information want to be Free?

Windows 2012 Hyper-V – The Hypervisor for your Cloud? Part I

Windows 2012 Hyper-V is the hypervisor for the cloud, and VMware’s vSphere is a dead man walking. So declared Aidan Finn at a recent virtualization conference in Hamburg during an enlightening entertaining session which he tastefully entitled, “Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V & VSphere 5.1 – Death Match”.

A bold statement? Hyper-V has often been cited as a “nearly ran”; good enough for the SMB space and smaller Private Clouds, but lacking the muscle for a cloud-focused enterprise. Nice for a visit, wouldn’t want to live there.

A biased statement? Aidan Finn is highly regarded Hyper-v Microsoft Most Valuable Professional and regularly writes on his website about changes and features of the product. In Predicatably Irrational, Dan Ariely dedicates a chapter to the possibility of a fan’s judgement being clouded. And yet, the list of features now available in Windows Hyper-V is compelling. Indeed, back in March we discussed if Microsoft would drive a wedge between VMware and EMC with Windows Server 2012 and Hyper-V.

In terms of embedded services and experience, VMware’s vSphere has a significant place in many organisations’ data centres. Licensing alone is unlikely to change hearts and minds to convert, but what about features?

Can Microsoft claim that Hyper-V is the hypervisor for the cloud? What new features are available in the 2012 release, and how does it now compare to vSphere 5.1. More importantly, will  these changes drive wider adoption?

In this first installment, we take a look at pricing, scalability, and performance, as well as storage.

Continue reading Windows 2012 Hyper-V – The Hypervisor for your Cloud? Part I

Moving to the Cloud!

DataCenterVirtualizationMoving to the cloud! Let me be a little more precise and say moving to the public cloud. This concept has really been embraced and thrives in the consumer market, but will this concept really take off in the corporate world, and really, should it? One of the main concepts of virtualization, in the beginning, was the ability to consolidate physical systems into a virtual environment to shrink the overall footprint, as well as to be able to take advantage of and use all available compute resources in a physical server, and to have centralized control of the computer, storage, and networking resources. Continue reading Moving to the Cloud!

VMware Horizon Mobile is Finally on the Way

CloudComputingSrinivas Krishnamurti (VMware – Senior Director for Mobile Solutions) has announced that VMware is partnering with Motorola and SoftBank to launch VMware Horizon Mobile in Japan. SoftBank Telecom will be offering Horizon Mobile as a cloud-based managed service which will be open for trials starting on December 10. Continue reading VMware Horizon Mobile is Finally on the Way