Cloud Computing

Cloud Computing focuses upon how to construct, secure, manage, monitor and use public IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS clouds. Major areas of focus include barriers to cloud adoption, progress on the part of cloud vendors in removing those barriers, where the line of responsibility is drawn between the cloud vendor and the customer for each of IaaS, PaaS and SaaS clouds, (Read More)

as well as the management tools that are essential to deploy in the cloud, ensure security in the cloud and ensure the performance of applications running in the cloud. Covered vendors include Amazon, VMware, AFORE, CloudSidekick, CloudPhysics, ElasticBox, Hotlink, New Relic, Prelert, Puppet Labs and Virtustream.

Medicine as a Service: Could this be the next cloud frontier?

CloudComputingMedicine as a Service: Could this be the next cloud frontier? For most of the last decade there have been a lot of hospitals and medical services groups that have been migrating their workloads from physical servers to virtual servers and that are now expanding from just a virtual environment to include more cloud computing platforms and/or services. Continue reading Medicine as a Service: Could this be the next cloud frontier?

A Look at the Dell Active System 800

Dell100x30aWith recent announcements of software-defined networking capabilities for their Active System line of converged infrastructure it’s worth taking a look at the converged infrastructure offerings from Dell. Right now that consists solely of the Dell Active System 800, a preconfigured & pre-integrated solution aiming to compete with the VCE Vblock and NetApp FlexPods of the world, though the Dell vStart lineup also offers similar hardware with more of a do-it-yourself focus on software integration. Continue reading A Look at the Dell Active System 800

How Will VMware Win Against Microsoft?

DataCenterVirtualizationWhile VMware is still the undisputed leader in enterprise data center virtualization, it is also very obvious that Microsoft has made (and continues to make) significant inroads into both the broader data center virtualization market and into VMware’s own enterprise customer base. The general perception is that Microsoft Hyper-V is now “good enough” to run most production workloads, that it is close enough (or at parity) in functionality and performance to vSphere for customers to be able to move workloads from vSphere to Hyper-V, and that vSphere is “expensive” and Hyper-V is “free”. So how will VMware win against Microsoft? Continue reading How Will VMware Win Against Microsoft?

Host Deployments in a Software Defined Data Center (SDDC)

DataCenterVirtualizationHost deployments in a Software Defined Data Center (SDDC):  How do you deploy the hypervisors in your company?  There are several different choices: installing from a CD, installing over the network, and/or Pre eXecution Environment (PXE), to name a few methods currently available. When there are not too many physical hypervisors to worry about, CD installation works just fine; the need for automated installation grows in direct correlation to the number of hosts. Continue reading Host Deployments in a Software Defined Data Center (SDDC)

DataStax – Three Ways to access the same Big Data

CloudComputingWe recently had a conversation with DataStax regarding their DataStax Enterprise product, which got us to thinking a little about the nature of Big Data and Cloud.   DataStax is the company behind the Open Source Cassandra NoSQL database. It provides technical direction and the majority of committers to the Apache Cassandra project.  Cassandra in turn is a Column Family-based database along the lines of Google’s BigTable. If you are a SQL programmer it’s determining feature is… it doesn’t do joins. Continue reading DataStax – Three Ways to access the same Big Data

OpenStack and the Software Defined Data Center (SDDC)

OpenStack Logoopenstack-cloud-software-vertical-smallThe OpenStack Summit this week continued to fan the flames of the software-defined data center. The software-defined data center is just a term for replacing traditional data center hardware functionality with the same features implemented in software, running on commodity x86 servers. While software-defined approaches to data center features are at least nominally less expensive than their hardware counterparts the real promise in the approach is flexibility and management ease with high levels of integration. Reconfiguring a network to support the security requirements of a new application is now just a function of  software and APIs. Expanding storage is just simply adding another node with more storage attached, and the cluster compensates automatically. Even things like firewall rules and load balancer configurations can now be stored as templates along with the applications, to be provisioned in minutes. Continue reading OpenStack and the Software Defined Data Center (SDDC)