Cloud Computing

Cloud Computing focuses upon how to construct, secure, manage, monitor and use public IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS clouds. Major areas of focus include barriers to cloud adoption, progress on the part of cloud vendors in removing those barriers, where the line of responsibility is drawn between the cloud vendor and the customer for each of IaaS, PaaS and SaaS clouds, (Read More)

as well as the management tools that are essential to deploy in the cloud, ensure security in the cloud and ensure the performance of applications running in the cloud. Covered vendors include Amazon, VMware, AFORE, CloudSidekick, CloudPhysics, ElasticBox, Hotlink, New Relic, Prelert, Puppet Labs and Virtustream.

Tracking the Hot Container Market

agilecloudThe container market is moving at the speed of light. Each vendor in this space is delivering features at an amazing pace. In fact, things are moving so fast that this article will likely be way outdated in about 2 months. It was just under two months ago when I reported on the many announcements made at DockerCon 2015 in San Francisco. Since then, each vendor has made a number of significant announcements about new features or partnerships. Here is a rundown of what has been announced by the major players in the hot container space. Continue reading Tracking the Hot Container Market

It Is That Time of Year Again

CloudComputingIt is that time of year again. Wow, another year has gone by so quickly. If you are reading this post, then most likely you have heard about VMworld 2015, which is happening at the end of this month in San Francisco. I am happy to say that I have the privilege of attending the conference again this year. This annual virtualization reunion is a chance to see people you only get to see once a year, though you probably have been communicating with each other in the meantime. If you are attending this year, I hope our paths can cross sometime during the week.

Continue reading It Is That Time of Year Again

IT Transformation: SME

BusinessAgilityThere are many reasons to use cloud resources, and there are many reasons to enter the cloud, of which we have spoken about fairly regularly as part of our IT Transformation series. The real question is: “When should you use cloud services?” Or, more to the point, “When should you use new cloud services in control of IT and not the business?” That is really the crux of the discussion; business users use cloud resources all the time. The choice to use them is based on getting your job done and not IT’s decisions. We often call this “shadow IT,” but is it? Let us look at a few examples and decide—is it shadow IT (as in, should be in IT’s hands to control?), or  is it part of doing business and therefore a business decision? Does the definition change as we grow a business or change the scale of the business? Continue reading IT Transformation: SME

IT Transformation: Show Back

CloudComputingThe last part of our IT transformation series is on show-back. The final—some say the first—component of using any cloud for Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) is cost. We plan to use a cloud to save on costs, but we have to be able to prove we will save money. Unfortunately, with all the approaches to IT transformation—top-down, migration, no changes to management—the truth is that excessive cloud use could turn into massive costs. Those costs, if not handled properly, will end up hamstringing any IT transformation after it happens. The answer is show-back. Continue reading IT Transformation: Show Back

Scale-Out Is a Benefit to HyperConverged

DataCenterVirtualizationI recently upgraded my nodes from 96 GB of memory to 256 GB of memory, and someone on Twitter stated the following:

@Texiwill thought the trend today is scale out not scale up? #cloud

The implication was that you never upgrade your hardware: you buy new or you enter the cloud. Granted, both options are beneficial. However, buying new and adding to your environment may not be necessary, and you most likely have already entered the cloud with the use of SaaS applications and perhaps some IaaS. The question still remains: upgrade, enhance existing hardware, or buy net new somewhere? When should you do any of these? Or should you at all? Continue reading Scale-Out Is a Benefit to HyperConverged