Cloud Computing

Cloud Computing focuses upon how to construct, secure, manage, monitor and use public IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS clouds. Major areas of focus include barriers to cloud adoption, progress on the part of cloud vendors in removing those barriers, where the line of responsibility is drawn between the cloud vendor and the customer for each of IaaS, PaaS and SaaS clouds, (Read More)

as well as the management tools that are essential to deploy in the cloud, ensure security in the cloud and ensure the performance of applications running in the cloud. Covered vendors include Amazon, VMware, AFORE, CloudSidekick, CloudPhysics, ElasticBox, Hotlink, New Relic, Prelert, Puppet Labs and Virtustream.

IT Transformation: Show Back

CloudComputingThe last part of our IT transformation series is on show-back. The final—some say the first—component of using any cloud for Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) is cost. We plan to use a cloud to save on costs, but we have to be able to prove we will save money. Unfortunately, with all the approaches to IT transformation—top-down, migration, no changes to management—the truth is that excessive cloud use could turn into massive costs. Those costs, if not handled properly, will end up hamstringing any IT transformation after it happens. The answer is show-back. Continue reading IT Transformation: Show Back

Scale-Out Is a Benefit to HyperConverged

DataCenterVirtualizationI recently upgraded my nodes from 96 GB of memory to 256 GB of memory, and someone on Twitter stated the following:

@Texiwill thought the trend today is scale out not scale up? #cloud

The implication was that you never upgrade your hardware: you buy new or you enter the cloud. Granted, both options are beneficial. However, buying new and adding to your environment may not be necessary, and you most likely have already entered the cloud with the use of SaaS applications and perhaps some IaaS. The question still remains: upgrade, enhance existing hardware, or buy net new somewhere? When should you do any of these? Or should you at all? Continue reading Scale-Out Is a Benefit to HyperConverged

Deploying Amazon WorkSpaces at Scale

DesktopVirtualizationI’ve made no secret of my dissatisfaction with Amazon’s WorkSpaces DaaS platform. While I like the general direction in which the platform is heading, and appreciate the impact that Amazon can have in the DaaS market, WorkSpaces has been slow to implement enterprise-class management features and suffers from too many rough edges to withstand close scrutiny when compared to many alternative solutions.

Nevertheless, it has gained some big-name support; at the recent AWS Summit, Johnson & Johnson’s Director of End User Computing Jeff Mendelsohn took to the stage alongside Nathan Thomas, General Manager Amazon WorkSpaces, to share Johnson & Johnson’s experience implementing Amazon WorkSpaces to support its large contractor community. Continue reading Deploying Amazon WorkSpaces at Scale

IT Transformation: No Changes to Management

CloudComputingIn previous articles, we discussed IT transformation in general, IT transformation and security, and the top-down and migration approaches to IT transformation. Now, it is time to discuss a method of IT transformation I call “no changes to management.” With this method, IT transformation happens by natural, existing means within the data center, by adding software to aid and augment existing management software. That software forms the core of a transformation engine that, in effect, migrates and manages your cloud presence from your on-premises existing management suite. Continue reading IT Transformation: No Changes to Management

VMware Solves Delegate User Problem

VirtualizationSecurityI have spoken and written quite a bit on the delegate user problem facing cloud and virtual environments. It is a growing problem, as we delegate actions from logged-in users to service accounts to implement changes on our systems. Any system, for example, that proxies administrative requests suffers from the delegate user problem. In essence, when we go to determine who did what, when, where, and how, forensics leads us to a delegate user or service account. We do not know beyond a shadow of a doubt who the user really was. We can correlate multiple log files, and based on time we may be able to come up with a set of users who could have done the deed. However, unless only one user was involved, we just end up with a set of users. Those sets of users, themselves, can be other service accounts—other delegate users, abstracting the real user. Continue reading VMware Solves Delegate User Problem