Business Agility

Business Agility covers using the technical agility delivered by virtualization and cloud computing to improve business agility, performance and results. This includes the agility derived from the proper implementation of Agile and DevOps methodologies, the agility derived from proper application and system architectures, (Read More)

the agility derived from the proper implementation of Infrastructure as a Server (IaaS), Platform as a Service (PaaS) and Software as a Service (SaaS) clouds, the agility derived from proper monitoring of the environment coupled with a process to resolve problems quickly, and the agility derived from have continuous availability through the use of high availability and disaster recovery products and procedures in place.

News: New Quest/VKernel vOperations Suite – Easy to Try and Easy to Buy Wins Again

Quest_Software100x30As we have noted before, virtualization and cloud computing are forcing a reinvention of the operations management business on two fronts. The first front is that virtualization and cloud computing introduce new requirements that legacy solutions do not meet and they break legacy products rendering them worse than useless (because the consume resources and money and add no value). The second front is that successful operations management vendors like Veeam, Xangati, VMTurbo, Zenoss, PHD Virtual, SolarWinds, Reflex Systems, VKernel, and VMware have all made it much easier to try and buy operations management solutions leading to a new business model for operations management vendors that makes the existing legacy way of selling enterprise systems management software completely unattractive to customers and irrelevant. Continue reading News: New Quest/VKernel vOperations Suite – Easy to Try and Easy to Buy Wins Again

VMware – The Next Microsoft, or the Next Oracle?

VMware100x30VMware is already the best (most competent) and most important (fastest growing and the source of the most innovation) system software company on the planet. But as successful as VMware has been to date, it is worthwhile to ask what lies ahead – and most importantly in what direction VMware is likely to go on some key business and technical issues. In order to understand the range of choices VMware has it is worth looking at both Microsoft and Oracle as points of reference. Continue reading VMware – The Next Microsoft, or the Next Oracle?

AppSense DataLocker gives Dropbox more security hints at the beginning of the end for VDI?

AppSense Labs have released a free suite, DataLocker. Not only is Datalocker AppSense’s first departure to support environments beyond Microsoft Windows, but it is intended to ease adding an extra layer of security to sensitive files before syncing them to cloud-based services.

What does AppSense Lab’s first product release have in its locker? What is the comparison to other cloud storage solutions? AppSense Labs is a new direction for AppSense, a company typically associated with managing windows desktop environments and enabling VDI. If AppSense is investing in new services beyond “traditional”   mobile/cross-device solutions such as VDI, what does this mean for those traditional solutions long term?

Continue reading AppSense DataLocker gives Dropbox more security hints at the beginning of the end for VDI?

Who’s Who in Managing your Virtual Infrastructure (vSphere, Hyper-V, etc.)

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In “CA Starts the Race To Self-Destruction Among the “Big Four” in Virtualization Management” we explained why the big four are not a good choice for managing your virtual infrastructure (and for that matter your private/hybrid/public cloud).  There are two top level reasons for this. The first is that virtualization both breaks how legacy management solutions work and introduces a new set of requirements that legacy solutions cannot address. The second is that the management vendors who are finding success in the virtualization market have focused upon an “easy to try, easy to buy, and affordable to own” business strategy that is the opposite of how the big four do business.  Continue reading Who’s Who in Managing your Virtual Infrastructure (vSphere, Hyper-V, etc.)

Browsium Ion: time to get going from IE6?

Reports on IE6’s death are often greatly exaggerated. A number of sites do offer statistics for consumer Internet browser share, but enterprise users are another breed and have a different browser use profile: IE6 is still there alive and well in a large swathe of enterprise desktops. This puts a risk on projects that look to move an organisation beyond Windows XP.

To address this, Browsium have built on their experience in providing a solution to IE6 compatibility to launch Browsium Ion. Browsium have designed Ion to enable IE6 and IE7-dependent web applications to run unmodified in an IE8 or IE9 tab.

The end of life for IE6 is tied to Microsoft XP/Server 2003.. the clock ticks to 2014. Can Ion address the compatibility problems for corporates and still stay on the right side of Redmond? Will Browsium Ion get migration projects shackled by a reliance on IE6 going?

Continue reading Browsium Ion: time to get going from IE6?

Cloudyn Addresses the Economics of Public Cloud Computing

The good news about public cloud computing is that if you use it a little bit, or only on an intermittent basis, it is really cheap. The bad news is that if that casual use scales up to full time production use, public cloud computing can get really expensive in a hurry. This is especially a problem when people other than IT Operations sign up for the public cloud services – for example people who own and build applications in business units. Applications owners and developers do not have the cost minimization DNA that is very prevalent in IT Operations these days. Continue reading Cloudyn Addresses the Economics of Public Cloud Computing