Application Virtualization

Application Virtualization covers application layering and application delivery approaches like streaming applications, and local application virtualization. Infrastructure as a Service focuses upon isolating the operating system from its underlying hardware and allowing multiple instances of operating systems to share that underlying hardware. Application Virtualization focuses upon isolating application from their underlying operating systems. (Read More)

This make it unnecessary to install applications into operating systems, makes it easier to update new versions of applications, and breaks the dependencies between versions of applications and the specific versions of operating systems. Popular application virtualization offerings include Microsoft App-V, VMware ThinApp, and the XenApp Plugin for Hosted and Streaming applications.

VMworld US 2015: Day 3 Recap

vmworld2015Welcome to The Virtualization Practice’s week-long coverage of VMworld US 2015. Tune in all week for our daily recap of the major announcements and highlights from the world’s premier virtualization and cloud conference.

VMworld US 2015 continued yesterday, kicked off by the general session. End-User Computing’s Sanjay Poonen led the keynote, in which VMware fleshed out what it means by “any application and any device” within the “Ready for Any” theme of the conference. Beginning with the VMware Workspace Suite, VMware talked at length about the growth of mobile computing and how AirWatch, together with VMware App Volumes, enables IT to manage all Windows 10 devices (physical and virtual, mobile or not), as well as iOS and Android devices, from a single pane of glass. Foreshadowing the next speaker, Poonen wrapped up his portion by talking about the synergies between AirWatch, Horizon, and NSX, with policy settings in NSX affecting and being affected by AirWatch connectivity and data access.

Continue reading VMworld US 2015: Day 3 Recap

Citrix: New Migration Tool to Transition from VMware View 6.1 to XenDesktop 7.6

Citrix100x30The application and desktop virtualization war between Citrix and VMware continues to escalate. Yesterday, Citrix released the VMware Migration Tool, which enables a fast and easy transition from VMware View 6.1 to XenDesktop 7.6. This tool works to migrate not only to on-premises XenDesktop environments, but also to Citrix Workspace Cloud.

Continue reading Citrix: New Migration Tool to Transition from VMware View 6.1 to XenDesktop 7.6

Which Data Is Passed from My Physical Device to the Virtual Infrastructure?

DesktopVirtualizationWith the proliferation of virtualized applications and desktops, the concept of any user accessing any application or desktop from any device has become reality. Whether accessed from a smartphone, tablet, or desktop, whether tethered or untethered, all the resources that users require must be accessible.

Continue reading Which Data Is Passed from My Physical Device to the Virtual Infrastructure?

Tracking the Hot Container Market

agilecloudThe container market is moving at the speed of light. Each vendor in this space is delivering features at an amazing pace. In fact, things are moving so fast that this article will likely be way outdated in about 2 months. It was just under two months ago when I reported on the many announcements made at DockerCon 2015 in San Francisco. Since then, each vendor has made a number of significant announcements about new features or partnerships. Here is a rundown of what has been announced by the major players in the hot container space. Continue reading Tracking the Hot Container Market

Should We Care If the Handheld Is Secure?

VirtualizationSecurityAndroid devices recently suffered a spate of attacks. Similar attacks have been made against Apple devices and nearly every other brand of smart device. Does this mean that this is the end of Android or of mobile devices? Or does this mark the rise of mobile device management (MDM) and other software specifically designed to secure end user computing (EUC) devices? EUC security has two failure points: the handheld device and further in the network. But does an insecure device imply loss of data? Perhaps. Loss of credentials? Once more, perhaps. But do we really care? That is not known. So, let us look at a typical use case. Continue reading Should We Care If the Handheld Is Secure?