Tag Archives: Windows 7

Microsoft User Experience Virtualization. Can’t you find something more important to do?

Microsoft100x3016 years after it introduced roaming profiles with the launch of Windows NT 4.0 Microsoft has decided to give it another go. In a blog post on Wednesday Karri Alexion-Tiernan (Director of Product Management for Microsoft Desktop Virtualization) announced the public beta of two new technologies, a major update to Microsoft App-V and an all new roaming profile solution User Experience Virtualization (UE-V). Both products will ship as part of a future Microsoft Desktop Optimization Pack (MDOP) release. Continue reading Microsoft User Experience Virtualization. Can’t you find something more important to do?

Centrix Software Simplify Windows 7 Migration

DesktopVirtualizationWith less than 800 days until the day that Microsoft withdraws support for Windows XP, IT departments  are coming under increasing pressure to get off Windows XP and start their Windows 7 Migration. Many are looking to desktop virtualization in one form or another. Some are considering desktop virtualization simply as an expedient means of escaping from Windows XP whereas others view desktop virtualization more strategically looking at it as a means of supporting increasing needs for agility in a world driven by the increasing consumerization of IT (CoIT).

In a timely move,  Centrix Software have released WorkSpace iQ 5.3 and are looking to ease the burden of Windows XP migration and provide ongoing analytics of end-user computing environments both physical and virtual.  Can Centrix software’s latest update reduce desktop transformation time-lines and what new features have been introduced?

Continue reading Centrix Software Simplify Windows 7 Migration

Browsium Ion: time to get going from IE6?

Reports on IE6’s death are often greatly exaggerated. A number of sites do offer statistics for consumer Internet browser share, but enterprise users are another breed and have a different browser use profile: IE6 is still there alive and well in a large swathe of enterprise desktops. This puts a risk on projects that look to move an organisation beyond Windows XP.

To address this, Browsium have built on their experience in providing a solution to IE6 compatibility to launch Browsium Ion. Browsium have designed Ion to enable IE6 and IE7-dependent web applications to run unmodified in an IE8 or IE9 tab.

The end of life for IE6 is tied to Microsoft XP/Server 2003.. the clock ticks to 2014. Can Ion address the compatibility problems for corporates and still stay on the right side of Redmond? Will Browsium Ion get migration projects shackled by a reliance on IE6 going?

Continue reading Browsium Ion: time to get going from IE6?

Consumerization of IT: AppSense and Centrix Software alliance recognise its more than just “how can my CFO justify their iPad”?

You know you’re not going to have a good day when your father, rather than offering you the chance to rule the galaxy by his side, announces your demise. In 1981 Mark Dean was part of the IBM team that delivered the Personal Computer (PC): yet Mr Dean has looked at his stricken progeny, clinging afraid and alone above an abyss and said – “do you know what, I’d prefer a tablet”.

In the past 30 years the PC has been a device that has been adopted by both the consumer and corporate markets. Back in the day, applications were supplied from a centralised cloud service, billed on usage: users accessed that service via a thin client. “Personalisation”, indeed “getting processing time” was complex. A young upstart company called Apple introduced the Apple II. It may have started as a consumer device, but the PC was rapidly adopted as a corporate IT tool to drive agility and productivity. In this galaxy, not so long ago, IT literate users railed against expensive and rigid mainframes and demanded… a PC. They got it. Arguably, corporate IT departments have spent thirty years trying to rest back some semblance of control and help the businesses accommodate the high costs of unmanaged and chaotic environments.

AppSense, a leading provider of user virtualization technology, and Centrix Software, provider of unified end-user computing solutions, have announced a strategic partnership to provide organizations with a comprehensive, user-centric transformation program. Do you need a user-centric transformation program? How could this alliance help your business manage IT beyond the ‘single-PC-for-every-user’ era? If they can help you, are they your only hope? Will it justify your CFO’s iPad?

Continue reading Consumerization of IT: AppSense and Centrix Software alliance recognise its more than just “how can my CFO justify their iPad”?

Microsoft Enterprise Desktop Virtualization – MED-V: Just a Band-Aid Solution?

Is Microsoft Enterprise Desktop Virtualization (MED-V) simply a Band-Aid? That is to say, not really a long term solution but a cover-up until it is “all better”? Is Med-V only a ‘point solution’ to ease migration or can you use that functionality to a wider audience to solve other problems?

Despite Redmond hailing Windows 7’s success, surveys have shown that Windows XP is still more than alive and kicking. A barrier for migration from Windows XP, is the “unknown risk” (and of course risk=cost) of not being able to run business critical applications in “the new environment”. MED-V, part of the Microsoft Desktop Optimization Pack (MDOP), allows migration from an old Microsoft operating environment to a new Microsoft OS while allowing access to ‘legacy’ applications. At the same time, MED-V gives your company the facility to manage both the ‘new’ and the ‘old’ operating systems and provide users with an integrated environment – merging legacy applications into the new workspace.

Here at TVP we believe in the maxim, “its not just how do you do it, but how do you manage it once its done“. What does MED-V offer over and above, say, Windows Virtual PC – or other non-Microsoft Client Side Hypervisors? Can MED-V  help you to migrate onwards and upwards more quickly? What would the benefits of implementing it be? Is “migration” MED-V’s only function or are there additional uses? Is it cost effective? What are the alternatives?

Continue reading Microsoft Enterprise Desktop Virtualization – MED-V: Just a Band-Aid Solution?

Microsoft and Citrix offer a “Rescue for VMware VDI”

On March 18, Microsoft embarked on a major offensive to focus the desktop virtualisation market away from VMware View. As well as announcing updates for their desktop virtualization technologies and solutions, including virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI), Microsoft and Citrix Systems jointly announced two major promotions:

“Rescue for VMware VDI” – Starting in April 2010,  VMware View customers who have Microsoft Core CAL or Enterprise CAL suites with Software Assurance through Select, Enterprise & CASA family of agreements are offered the opportunity to trade in up to 500 licenses for free up until December 2010.

“VDI Kick Start” from March 18, if you’ve a Microsoft Core CAL or Enterprise CAL suites with Software Assurance through Enterprise and Select family of agreements you are eligible customers only pay $28 per device for up to 250 devices. If you’ve an Open Value, Campus Agreement or School Agreement (CASA) family of agreements you’ll be eligible starting July 1, 2010.

Are these announcements marketing hype or do they actually help deliver an improved VDI experience? Indeed, are you a VMware View house in peril?

Continue reading Microsoft and Citrix offer a “Rescue for VMware VDI”