Tag Archives: vSphere

Life without the Cloud or Reasons to use a Hybrid Cloud

The Virtualization Practice was recently offline for two days, we thank you for coming back to us after this failure. The reason, a simple fibre cut that would have taken the proper people no more than 15 minutes to fix, but we were way down on the list due to the nature of the storm that hit New England and took 3M people off the grid.  Even our backup mechanisms were out of power. While our datacenter had power, the rest of the area in our immediate vicinity did not. So not only were we isolated from reaching any clouds, but we were isolated from being reached from outside our own datacenter. The solution to such isolation is usually remote sites and location of services in other regions of a country, this gets relatively expensive for small and medium business, can the Hybrid Cloud help here? Continue reading Life without the Cloud or Reasons to use a Hybrid Cloud

State of Secure Multitenancy Today

On 9/22 was held the Virtualization Security Podcast featuring Anil Karmel, Solutions Architect at Los Alamos National Library (LANL), to discuss their implementation of secure multi-tenant Cloud. LANL makes extensive use of the entire VMware product suite from vCloud Director down to the vShield components to implement their SMT cloud. They have also added into their cloud their own intellectual property to improve overall cloud security. It was a very interesting conversation about the state of SMT today. Continue reading State of Secure Multitenancy Today

Why VASA is important to have in your VMware CASA

By Greg Schulz, Server and StorageIO @storageio

There are many enhancements and new features that are part of VMware vSphere V5.0 from a storage and I/O perspective (See VMware vSphere v5 and Storage DRS posts). One of those enhancements is a new Application Programming Interface (API) called VASA (vSphere Aware Storage API) which joins other VMware vSphere APIs some of which are shown in table 1. Note that there is a three letter acronym (TLA) shown in Table 1 that is part of the VMware vSphere 5.0 release that can be confused with VASA called VSA (VMware Storage Appliance) however for now, let’s leave VSA for a future discussion. Continue reading Why VASA is important to have in your VMware CASA

Agent and Agent-less Backup in the Virtual Environment

There is some debate amongst backup vendors on what defines an agent, some consider any amount of scripting to be an agent, while others imply it is what does the data transfer plus any amount of scripting necessary.  Is there a need for both Agent and Agent-less within a virtual environment? This also begs the question, who is responsible for properly handling the application whose data you are backing up? Continue reading Agent and Agent-less Backup in the Virtual Environment

Licensing: Pools and Architecture Changes?

In the past, virtualization architects and administrators were told the best way forward is to buy as much fast memory as they could afford as well as standardize on one set of boxes with as many CPUs as they dare use. With vRAM Pool licensing this type of open-ended RAM architecture will change as now I have to consider vRAM pools when I architect new cloud and virtual environments. So let’s look at this from existing virtual environments and then onto new virtual and cloud environments. How much a change will this be to how I architect things today, and how much of a change is there to my existing virtual environments? Is it a better decision to stay at vSphere 4? Or to switch hypervisors entirely?

VDI Environments

Yesterday, Simon Bramfit vSphere 5 – Did VMware Misjudge its Licensing Changes? requested a VDI only version of vSphere and yesterday VMware responded with vSphere Desktop which for VDI removes the vRAM Entitlement barrier. I see this as progress and that VMware is listening. Unfortunately, this is for new purchases and you cannot convert existing vSphere licenses into vSphere Desktop licenses.

Existing Virtual Environments Continue reading Licensing: Pools and Architecture Changes?

Replication Receiver Clouds: Protecting your Data

Security in the cloud and the virtual environment is ‘all about the data’ and not specifically about any other subsystem. It is about the data. As such the data has something it knows (the contents of the data), something it is (its signature), and something it has (its digital rights) and since it has these three elements, the data has all it has identity. However, protecting the data requires us to put things between the data and the real world such as firewalls, and complex role based access controls, as well as methods to replicate the data to other locations in a non-intrusive mechanism.  The goal to such replication could be to ensure multiple sites have the same data (such as a hot-site) or to have the data available in another locations in case of disaster. In addition, such data must maintain its identity. Continue reading Replication Receiver Clouds: Protecting your Data