Tag Archives: VMWare ACE

MokaFive steps in to fill VMware ACE gap

On December 1, VMware announced plans to discontinue sales of it’s type II desktop virtualization hypervisor management platform VMware ACE Assured Computing Environment (ACE), leaving existing ACE customers in the lurch with no recommended way forwards. Now MokaFive is looking to fill the gap by offering a heavily discounted MokaFive Suite to help them out.

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VMware doesn’t have a Client Side Hypervisor solution – so what?

One announcement that is unlikely to be made at VMworld in 2010 is the release of VMware’s Client Hypervisor. While VMware may have got accustomed to dominating the world of server virtualization, its attempts to become the de-facto virtualization vendor on the desktop haven’t  gone quite as well. Despite it being nearly two years since announcing its “vClient initiative“, VMware has yet to announce a delivery date for the proposed client side hypervisor component. Citrix, on the other hand, is proudly touting XenClient. Other vendors, such as VirtualComputer are actively promoting their products.

Its likely Citrix will  have beaten VMware to delivering a Client Hypervisor. While XenClient is currently a Release Candidate version, Citrix announced that the v1.0 will be released with XenDesktop 4 Feature Pack 2 in September 2010.

Is the lack of Client Hypervisor (CHv) a problem for VMware in delivering  a complete desktop solution to customers? Indeed, is the CHv technology viable for business use now? And when (and if) it is a viable technology, where should a CHv be considered in your desktop strategy? What could a Client Hypervisor be used for?

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Microsoft Enterprise Desktop Virtualization – MED-V: Just a Band-Aid Solution?

Is Microsoft Enterprise Desktop Virtualization (MED-V) simply a Band-Aid? That is to say, not really a long term solution but a cover-up until it is “all better”? Is Med-V only a ‘point solution’ to ease migration or can you use that functionality to a wider audience to solve other problems?

Despite Redmond hailing Windows 7’s success, surveys have shown that Windows XP is still more than alive and kicking. A barrier for migration from Windows XP, is the “unknown risk” (and of course risk=cost) of not being able to run business critical applications in “the new environment”. MED-V, part of the Microsoft Desktop Optimization Pack (MDOP), allows migration from an old Microsoft operating environment to a new Microsoft OS while allowing access to ‘legacy’ applications. At the same time, MED-V gives your company the facility to manage both the ‘new’ and the ‘old’ operating systems and provide users with an integrated environment – merging legacy applications into the new workspace.

Here at TVP we believe in the maxim, “its not just how do you do it, but how do you manage it once its done“. What does MED-V offer over and above, say, Windows Virtual PC – or other non-Microsoft Client Side Hypervisors? Can MED-V  help you to migrate onwards and upwards more quickly? What would the benefits of implementing it be? Is “migration” MED-V’s only function or are there additional uses? Is it cost effective? What are the alternatives?

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Delivering your “desktop as a service” to laptop users

The cost savings for desktop virtualization have been widely shouted for some time. Often from desktop virtualization vendors. Effectively, these savings come through reducing the desktop management costs but fundamentally by improving your organisations ability to deliver the user’s workspace quickly and effectively – enhancing those management savings with increased productivity. Yet,  the majority of current solutions focus on delivering workspaces to devices that are on the network – be they LAN based or WAN based the device needs to be attached to the network to be able to function. Can you deliver your services to laptop users who need to operate off-line?

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