Tag Archives: VMTurbo

Your VMworld 2011 Enterprise Virtualization Performance and Capacity Management Short List

With VMworld 2011 around the corner whose booth’s should you visit? Well if you are an enterprise with a large scale virtualization initiative then performance and capacity management should be at or near the top of your mind.  VMware clearly agrees as they have announced and delivered vCenter Operations specifically to meet this need. So after you go see vC Ops Enterprise, what else should you go see?  Continue reading Your VMworld 2011 Enterprise Virtualization Performance and Capacity Management Short List

vSphere 5 Licensing – The Role of Cross Platform Management Tools and the Hotlink SuperVISOR

So you are a loyal VMware customer. You have licenses for vSphere 4 and you are about 40% virtualized. Based upon the revised vRAM entitlements in the revised vSphere 5 licensing, you think you are going to be OK as you progress through the more demanding business critical purchased and custom developed applications that lie in front of you. Continue reading vSphere 5 Licensing – The Role of Cross Platform Management Tools and the Hotlink SuperVISOR

Licensing: Pools and Architecture Changes?

In the past, virtualization architects and administrators were told the best way forward is to buy as much fast memory as they could afford as well as standardize on one set of boxes with as many CPUs as they dare use. With vRAM Pool licensing this type of open-ended RAM architecture will change as now I have to consider vRAM pools when I architect new cloud and virtual environments. So let’s look at this from existing virtual environments and then onto new virtual and cloud environments. How much a change will this be to how I architect things today, and how much of a change is there to my existing virtual environments? Is it a better decision to stay at vSphere 4? Or to switch hypervisors entirely?

VDI Environments

Yesterday, Simon Bramfit vSphere 5 – Did VMware Misjudge its Licensing Changes? requested a VDI only version of vSphere and yesterday VMware responded with vSphere Desktop which for VDI removes the vRAM Entitlement barrier. I see this as progress and that VMware is listening. Unfortunately, this is for new purchases and you cannot convert existing vSphere licenses into vSphere Desktop licenses.

Existing Virtual Environments Continue reading Licensing: Pools and Architecture Changes?

News: VMTurbo Raises the Bar for Free vSphere Monitoring – Again

Back in May, VMTurbo broke some new ground in terms of what was available in terms of free vSphere monitoring tools, by making some right-sizing reports that were previously part of paid for capacity management and planning solutions available for free.  Now VMTurbo has built upon the earlier breakthrough by making a fully functional performance and capacity management solution that is not time limited nor limited to size of environment available in the form of the VMTurbo Community Edition (Download).

The What and the Why

VMTurbo, like any software company, is in business to make money. So of course there are paid for editions of the product. The table below shows the differences between the free edition (the Community Edition) and the two paid for versions.

The key thing to realize about VMTurbo is that unlike many vendors who simply collect vCenter data, store it, analyze it, dashboard it, report on it and alert on it, VMTurbo has some very unique technical capabilities (which of course they charge for in their paid products), that allow VMTurbo to make what is rapidly becoming “commodity” vSphere monitoring functionality available for free.

The secret sauce at VMTurbo is the ability to price (in virtual dollars) scarce resources, to allow you to assign budgets to workloads (applications running in VM’s), and to then either make recommendations or to automatically execute those recommendations. Strategically VMTurbo is therefore further down the path towards Service Assurance (the idea that the infrastructure adjusts automatically to ensure that the most critical applications perform as required) than any other vendor. The only thing missing from VMTurbo’s bag of tricks is a true view into applications performance (response time) which will doubtless be handled via partnerships with various APM vendors.

These unique capabilities (and the ability to charge for them in the paid products) allows VMTurbo to make baseline performance and capacity management for vSphere environments available for free.  This represents a significant redefinition of where the value is and where the value is not in the virtualization performance management business.

Security of Performance and Management tools within the Virtual Environment

One of the basic tenants of virtualization security is to protect the management components of your virtualization hosts by placing these all important components on a separate network. These components often include management servers such as SCOM, vCenter, XenCenter, VirtManager, etc. as well as the management appliances of your virtualization hosts. In essence, the use of a properly configured, firewalled, and monitored virtualization management network would be the simplest and most effective security measure that can be made to day within any virtual environment. A message shared by Citrix, VMware, myself, and many others.

The problem is that not everything is as black and white as security folks desire. If we implement performance and other management tools, we often need to expose part of our all important virtualization management network to others. But how do we do this safely, securely, with minimal impact to usability? Why do we need to this is also another question. You just have to take one look at the Virtualization ASsessment TOolkit (Vasto) to realize the importance of this security requirement. But the question still exists, how do you implement other necessary tools within your virtual environment without impacting usability? Which we discussed on the May 5th Virtualization Security Podcast. Continue reading Security of Performance and Management tools within the Virtual Environment

VMTurbo Breaks New Ground for Free vSphere Monitoring Tools

VMTurbo has broken some significant new ground in terms of what is available for free in a virtual appliance that manages the performance and capacity of VMware vSphere environments. This new free tool is not time limited, nor is it limited in terms of the size of the environment that it can address. Continue reading VMTurbo Breaks New Ground for Free vSphere Monitoring Tools