Tag Archives: vCloud

IT as a Service: Not Just for a Cloud

DataCenterVirtualizationI was going to write about how building a cloud is similar to moving, but the more I think about it, the more I think people are confusing an automated virtual environment with a cloud: IT as a Service is not just about cloud. Having automation does not imply your virtual environment is a cloud or visa versa. Granted, using IT as a Service is important for a cloud if you look at the NIST definition of a cloud, but it is not necessary for a cloud. Perhaps IT as a Service is just a stepping stone towards a cloud, perhaps it should start as a data center play? As company’s and vendors cloud wash all aspects of IT, as IT decision makers we need to step back and look at our data center and decide how we want to get to the cloud (if we want to get there at all). Continue reading IT as a Service: Not Just for a Cloud

It Is Time To Expand The Virtual Playing Field

CloudComputingIt is time to expand the virtual playing field. Since the release of both Hyper-V 2012 and vSphere 5.1, there have been an abundant amount of posts comparing the two hypervisors in a head to head fashion.  All the different charts, graphs, and tables point to the fact that when comparing maximum values head to head. This has been the way the two different hypervisors have been compared against each other all along and Microsoft and VMware have gotten to the point where things are pretty much even across the board. It was just a matter of time until we got to this point where Hyper-V catches up with vSphere and now that we have, I believe we need to change the scope of the comparisons beyond the maximum values.  After all, how many people actually get anywhere close to those maximums deployed in your production environments?  “Just because you can do something, does not mean you should.” Continue reading It Is Time To Expand The Virtual Playing Field

A Secure Cloud Framework for Non-Clouds

DataCenterVirtualizationIs it possible to use a cloud framework to better secure your datacenter? Do cloud technologies provide a secure framework for building more than just clouds? We all know that virtualization is a building block to the cloud, but there may be a way to use cloud frameworks to first secure your datacenter before you launch a private, public, or hybrid cloud. In essence, we can use tools like vCloud Director to provide a more secure environment that properly segregates trust zones from one another while allowing specific accesses.

Continue reading A Secure Cloud Framework for Non-Clouds

Hotlink’s Cross-Platform Management Technology

DataCenterVirtualizationOne of the companies and technologies to watch is Hotlink with its Cross-Platform Management Technology (winner of Best of Show, VMworld 2012). If you have not heard of this before, I think you will in the near future. This technology allows you to use VMware’s vCenter Server to manage and control all major hypervisors and public clouds to include VMware vSphere, Microsoft Hyper-V, Citrix XenServer, Red Hat Enterprise Linux (KVM), CloudStack, and Amazon EC2, all from within VMware vCenter. Continue reading Hotlink’s Cross-Platform Management Technology

vCloud Suite: Why is VMware Turning its Back on VM-based Licensing?

CloudComputingAt VMworld VMware announced the release of the vCloud Suite of products. This new suite of packages, depending on the level purchased, bundles together several individual products into a single purchase point. See the table later for details of which package includes which product.

However, to me the most interesting point was the fact that this suite is purchased per processor, not per VM. This, coupled with VMware’s announcement of the death of vRAM, means that you can in theory now get a lot more bang per buck spent with no artificial limits set on usage. Continue reading vCloud Suite: Why is VMware Turning its Back on VM-based Licensing?

Public Cloud Computing – Economics and Throats to Choke

CloudComputingWhen enterprises consider putting business-critical workloads in public clouds, many of them overlook, at least in part, critical issues of economics and over what portion of their cloud software stack the cloud vendor has full control. This leads to a situation where sometimes relatively inexpensive offerings where the vendor has full control of their software stack (like Amazon EC2) are improperly compared to an offering from a vendor like Savvis or Terramark who is building a cloud out of either VMware-provided components or OpenStack components. This gives rise to important issues that drive both the cost of the respective offerings and the degree to which the cloud vendor can both enhance the offerings with rapid agility and quickly address service level issues. Continue reading Public Cloud Computing – Economics and Throats to Choke