Tag Archives: Red Hat

Cloud: Developing over the Chasm in 2011

In 2012  should you use Virtual Infrastructure, Infrastructure Cloud (IaaS) or Platform Cloud (PaaS).  Which one has crossed the Chasm?

Now, of course, this is a simplified version of the question, because in almost all cases Infrastructure Clouds and Platform Clouds are built on a Virtual Environment, and in most cases Platform Cloud is built on an Infrastructure Cloud, so the question is really about how far into the Cloud you should be prepared to go.  My perspective here is of a development manager – someone who is charged with building a new application. I’m thinking as a development manager not a developer and I’m making decisions to maximise the productivity of a development team – rather than on the “shininess” of the technology – by developing in the cloud. Continue reading Cloud: Developing over the Chasm in 2011

PaaS Platform experience – Red Hat OpenShift

As mentioned in a couple of recent posts, I have been building a prototype application using Open Source technologies that I plan to install on a number of available PaaS cloud platforms.  The application is written in Groovy (with some bits in Java) and built on the Grails framework. The choice to go with this set of technologies is documented in Why would a Developer choose VMware? and my experiences leveraging the Open Source ecosystem around Groovy/Grails is outlined in VMware’s SpringSource Ecosystem

Subsequent to those posts I still feel pretty comfortable about the technology choices, although I have had to move away from the “scaffolded” user interface provided by Grails and build some javascript widgetry that sits in the browser. For this I chose another technology I happen to be familiar with called Dojo. It’s essentially a set of compressed javascript files that can be served out from any web server, or even linked to dynamically at one of three externally-hosted sites. It can be used to make a web application look like a proper enterprise application with menus, tabbed panels, grids and charts etc. I glued it back into the Grails Controller/Domain layer via json and Xhr (Ajax). Continue reading PaaS Platform experience – Red Hat OpenShift

Red Hat releases MRG 2.0 – messaging for the cloud.

We’ve touched on Red Hat’s Cloud strategy in a number of posts. To summarize they’re trying to play at all levels in the stack, from IAAS and PaaS through to hypervisor and of course operating system. All layers are open, and as you get further down the stack towards virtualization they are pushing KVM but they are clear that they have to co-exist with Microsoft and VMware.  In the IaaS layer they have DeltaCloud, which is nominally open but is really a Red Hat product with an open veneer. In the PaaS layer they have a stack of really good middleware from JBoss, and an openness to a whole bunch of Java/JVM and non-JVM languages.  They’re punting this out to the world as OpenShift.

So far, although there are nuances that differ from other vendors, the main conclusion is that each individual layer is comparable to offerings from competitors.  However, there is one layer that sets Red Hat apart from competitive offerings, known as MRG – Messaging Realtime and Grid, pronounced “Merge”.  If you’re wondering what this is, it seems also that some of are bits of Red Hat’s marketing department that haven’t got a clue either because the market positioning is a bit vague. Continue reading Red Hat releases MRG 2.0 – messaging for the cloud.

VMware’s SpringSource Ecosystem

As mentioned in my previous piece I’ve been doing some prototyping using SpringSource’s Grails. Grails can be thought of as the top of the stack.  If you pick up Grails you would naturally pull in the other pieces of SpringSource, including vFabric and ultimately CloudFoundry.   In a future post I will deal with what happens when you stick Grails onto CloudFoundry, but at this stage I’ve been assessing the health of the SpringSource Ecosystem. Continue reading VMware’s SpringSource Ecosystem

VMware’s “Squeeze the OS” Strategy – Open War with Microsoft and Red Hat

VMware’s CloudFoundry announcement has enormously clarified VMware’s long term strategy regarding its role in the Systems Software business. When VMware acquired SpringSource two years ago, it had application platform strategy that consisted of offering an enhanced version of Tomcat along with some development tools. This put VMware on the Java side of the Java vs. .NET wars, which was interesting, but it did not address the rapid proliferation of other application run time environments like Ruby and PHP that were continuing to drive the envelope of developer productivity. Continue reading VMware’s “Squeeze the OS” Strategy – Open War with Microsoft and Red Hat

VMware’s CloudFoundry and Red Hat’s OpenShift – Compare and Contrast

Over the last few weeks, VMware (as we indicated in an earlier post) and Red Hat have initiated two very similar initiatives known respectively as CloudFoundry and OpenShift. These are Platform as a Service (PaaS) plays, being developed for the longer term, primarily looking to encourage the development of (and thereafter to provide infrastructure for) applications specificallysuited to the the cloud. In this article we compare and contrast the two offerings and discuss their significance for the PaaS market as a whole. Continue reading VMware’s CloudFoundry and Red Hat’s OpenShift – Compare and Contrast