Tag Archives: PowerShell

Strategy for Cloud Automation

ITasaServiceStrategy for cloud automation: there are a lot of articles about the cloud and cloud computing, but I have not seen too many that discuss different strategies to consider when it comes to the automation in your environment. I did come across a nice post called “Legacy Job Schedulers: 3 Effective Exit Strategies to Consider,”1 by Jim Manias from Advanced Systems Concepts, Inc., that had some interesting points and thought it would be a great topic for discussion. Continue reading Strategy for Cloud Automation

A look at Microsoft Windows PowerShell Web Access

Microsoft Windows Server 8 Beta has been open to the public and there is one feature that really caught my eye. With Windows Server 8 you can now have basic PowerShell console over HTTPS with Microsoft Windows PowerShell Web Access (PSWA).  Think about the possibilities with that.  You get an email that there is an issue and you could start PWSA on your phone, or other device, and resolve the problem or request. Continue reading A look at Microsoft Windows PowerShell Web Access

Licensing: Pools and Architecture Changes?

In the past, virtualization architects and administrators were told the best way forward is to buy as much fast memory as they could afford as well as standardize on one set of boxes with as many CPUs as they dare use. With vRAM Pool licensing this type of open-ended RAM architecture will change as now I have to consider vRAM pools when I architect new cloud and virtual environments. So let’s look at this from existing virtual environments and then onto new virtual and cloud environments. How much a change will this be to how I architect things today, and how much of a change is there to my existing virtual environments? Is it a better decision to stay at vSphere 4? Or to switch hypervisors entirely?

VDI Environments

Yesterday, Simon Bramfit vSphere 5 – Did VMware Misjudge its Licensing Changes? requested a VDI only version of vSphere and yesterday VMware responded with vSphere Desktop which for VDI removes the vRAM Entitlement barrier. I see this as progress and that VMware is listening. Unfortunately, this is for new purchases and you cannot convert existing vSphere licenses into vSphere Desktop licenses.

Existing Virtual Environments Continue reading Licensing: Pools and Architecture Changes?

vSphere 4.1 and ESXi

Unless you have been on vacation or hiding under a rock then you have heard the latest buzz in the industry that vSphere 4.1 has been released. There have been a lot of blog posts on the topic already including one of our own.  The thing I want to hit on for this post is the fact that this release will be the last release for full version of ESX.  Moving forward on any new releases of ESX will be strictly ESXi.  Anyone that knows me over the years knows that I have not really been a big fan of getting rid of the full version ESX.  Call me old school and the fact that I have spent a great deal of time developing the automation used in the environments that I have supported over the years and have been really happy with what I was able to accomplish via kickstart and the command line.

Continue reading vSphere 4.1 and ESXi

When vCenter Alone Is Just Not Enough

One thing I have learned in the time I have spent working in IT is that no software product,  out of the box,  will do everything that you want it to do.  This especially goes for VMware’s vCenter Server.  This is a great product but yet still has its shortcoming.  vCenter will perform a lot of the tasks that we need to do and has the ability to report on a information we need to know about in our virtual environments but unfortunately not everything we need to know about can be easily found in bulk about multiple servers. Continue reading When vCenter Alone Is Just Not Enough

Are Hypervisor Vendors welcoming ISVs?

There is a great debate on which hypervisor vendor works with ISVs and which do not. You have a number of ISVs working with VMware that are just now starting to work with Hyper-V. A number of ISVs that are struggling to catch up in the virtualization space. Hypervisor Vendors that are directly competing with ISVs as well as welcoming ISVs. This story is not about any of this, but about how easy is it to launch a new product for each of the hypervisors available with or without help from the hypervisor vendor.  In essence, is there enough documentation, community, and code out there to be interpreted as welcoming ISVs. Continue reading Are Hypervisor Vendors welcoming ISVs?