Tag Archives: PAAS

3rd-Party Application Services – a sign of PaaS maturity

CloudComputingAs mentioned in a number of posts, there is a clear trend away from Platform-specific PaaS (where you write your application to the platform) and Language-Specific PaaS (which provide support to one or possibly a couple of  languages) to Universal PaaS, which is capable of supporting any language and any platform.  There’s a little bit of a gray area, but we would include ActiveState  Stackato,  AppFog, dotCloud, GigaSpaces  Cloudify, Red Hat  OpenShift, Salesforce Heroku, Uhuru Software AppCloud and VMware CloudFoundry in this category. These vendors differentiate themselves by providing a broad range of Application Services or Application Lifecycle Services. Continue reading 3rd-Party Application Services – a sign of PaaS maturity

Azure and Service Providers

CloudComputingBernd Harzog recently wrote about Microsoft’s Three Pronged Windows Azure Strategy – particularly with reference to the Service Provider offering. I’ve now had a certain amount of time to reflect on the announcement and try and work out what is going on and it doesn’t seem to constitute a wholehearted strategy to put resellers on a level playing field with Microsoft. Continue reading Azure and Service Providers

VMware should merge CloudFoundry with OpenStack

Agile Cloud DevelopmentWe suggest that to ensure CloudFoundry’s dominance, VMware should merge the dominant Open Source IaaS and PaaS initiatives into a single Foundation.

The PaaS market had a major false start in the period 2009 to 2012. The first PaaS vendors came to market with one of two premises

  • “we’ve got a really great platform you can use it if you want to”.  Good examples are Force.com (A PaaS derived from an IaaS – salesforce.com), Google App Engine and the original version of Azure
  •  “it’s a great place to run applications in a particular language” – good examples are Heroku (ruby) and PhpFog (PhP)

Since 2011 a second-generation of PaaS infrastructure has emerged which is exemplified by VMware’s CloudFoundry and Red Hat’s OpenShift. The biggest change between first and second generation PaaS is in the mindset. Instead of the first “P” in Platform as a service referring to “a Platform” it now refers to “any Platform”. In other words the job of the PaaS is to support any application in any language and deliver any set of services that any application might reasonably require. Whilst the first-generation PaaS was generally monolithic, the second-generation PaaS is usually capable of being implemented on a broad range of IaaS and/or virtual infrastructure, and the key factor is openness and diversity. Thus  CloudFoundry can be implemented on OpenStack. Continue reading VMware should merge CloudFoundry with OpenStack

IaaS or PaaS: 10 Keys for your Cloud Strategy

IaaS vs. PaaS Cloud Evaluation ChecklistOrganizations practicing agile development face many decisions when moving to the cloud. None is bigger than choosing whether to use IaaS or PaaS solutions for developing and deploying their applications. While each organization’s requirements are unique, there are 10 key criteria that can greatly influence an organization’s cloud strategy. Continue reading IaaS or PaaS: 10 Keys for your Cloud Strategy

AppFog – Polyglot Public/Private PaaS goes GA

CloudComputingAppFog (the company formerly known as PhpFog) has become the latest enthusiastic adopter of CloudFoundry to go to General Availability with a value-added implementation of the open source CloudFoundry.org stack.  The key differentiator is the RAM-based pricing policy around the Public Cloud offering – roughly $25 per GByte per month (first 2Gbytes are Free).

Continue reading AppFog – Polyglot Public/Private PaaS goes GA

OpenShift — Pricing and Comparison to AWS

CloudComputingOn June 26, Red Hat announced a new version of OpenShift, and pricing for a future production offering (some time this year). You still can’t buy it but if you were able to buy it you’d know exactly how much it could cost – at least if you could work out what a “gear” is. Pricing allows us to start to compare it more meaningfully with other offerings. However rather than comparing with another PaaS offering, we think most people will be actually considering IaaS as an alternative, so we are going to do that comparison instead.

Continue reading OpenShift — Pricing and Comparison to AWS