Tag Archives: PAAS

IBM as a Service

CloudComputingIn what may have seemed like an eternity, at least in the way time is measured in technology and the cloud space, IBM has been putting the finishing touches on its different acquisitions and the development of the Big Blue Cloud Stack. Although IBM seems to be fashionably late to the cloud party, I believe we are going to be seeing the Big Blue Battle Plan presented and executed in the near future. IBM is getting ready to step into the octagon to take on all comers, with its eye on Oracle, HP, Amazon, Microsoft, and VMware. It seems IBM is not going to settle with the typical as-a-service mode; on the contrary, it seems that it wants to usher itself into the new era with IBM as a Service. Continue reading IBM as a Service

It’s Deja Vu All Over Again in the Cloud

agilecloudThere is an old saying, “the definition of insanity is to repeat the same thing over and over and expect a different result.” The way many enterprises are approaching the cloud, insanity would be a great way of classifying it. When we look across most enterprises, we see a collection of technologies from every era of computing. We have just about every vendor solution imaginable—often multiple versions of products from the same vendor—and a hodgepodge of architectures that makes spaghetti look organized.

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The War on PaaS

For over a year now, a large number of industry experts have been asking questions like “is PaaS becoming just a feature of IaaS?,” “is PaaS dying?,” “do you really need a PaaS?,” and “is PaaS dead?” This has raised great deal of passionate debate in Twitter-land and other social media outlets, although supporters of stand-alone PaaS solutions are mostly those who are employed by vendors of those solutions. Continue reading The War on PaaS

OpenShift, Why Won’t You Do What I Want?

Agile Cloud Development

I recently spent a fruitless afternoon on the public PaaS version of Cloud Foundry. In this post, I document an equally fruitless afternoon spent on Red Hat’s OpenShift. It think it is fair to say that OpenShift has some advantages over Cloud Foundry for public PaaS. OpenShift feels more comfortable, its integration of a build server introduces a lot of flexibility into its deployment, it makes it easier to know what is going on, and it seems to have more documentation and more discussion on the forums. However, once you veer away from the standard use case, it doesn’t work terribly well. Ultimately, I failed to get it to do what I wanted, but maybe it was just too hard.

Continue reading OpenShift, Why Won’t You Do What I Want?