Tag Archives: Oracle

News: Oracle Buys Xsigo Systems

Coming on the heels of VMware’s acquisition of Nicira, Oracle announced today that it is acquiring network virtualization vendor Xsigo Systems for an undisclosed amount. So now two shoes have dropped in the question of how networks will be designed and operated in the future (perhaps the entity in question is an octopus, and we have six shoes to go). Clearly the notion of software defined networks has legs and clearly VMware is not the only company who sees this.

The Oracle Announcement

Oracle Buys Xsigo

Extends Oracle’s Virtualization Capabilities with Leading Software-Defined Networking Technology for Cloud Environments

  • Oracle today announced that it has entered into an agreement to acquire Xsigo Systems, a leading provider of network virtualization technology.
  • Xsigo’s software-defined networking technology simplifies cloud infrastructure and operations by allowing customers to dynamically and flexibly connect any server to any network and storage, resulting in increased asset utilization and application performance while reducing cost.
  • The company’s products have been deployed at hundreds of enterprise customers including British Telecom, eBay, Softbank and Verizon.
  • The combination of Xsigo for network virtualization and Oracle VM for server virtualization is expected to deliver a complete set of virtualization capabilities for cloud environments.

Terms of the agreement were not disclosed. More information on this announcement can be found at oracle.com/xsigo.

Supporting Quotes

  • “The proliferation of virtualized servers in the last few years has made the virtualization of the supporting network connections essential,” said John Fowler, Oracle Executive Vice President of Systems. “With Xsigo, customers can reduce the complexity and simplify management of their clouds by delivering compute, storage and network resources that can be dynamically reallocated on-demand.”
  • “Customers are focused on reducing costs and improving utilization of their network,” said Lloyd Carney, Xsigo CEO. “Virtualization of these resources allows customers to scale compute and storage for their public and private clouds while matching network capacity as demand dictates.”

What Does This Mean?

The most disconcerting statement in the release is the part about the “combination of Xsigo and Oracle VM”. This means that Oracle is continuing to play its “vertically integrated solution stack” game, which is in direct contrast to the horizontally layered strategies that VMware, Microsoft, Red Hat, Citrix, the CloudStack community, and the OpenStack community are all pursuing. While this might be very appealing to a customer that is 100% or nearly 100% Oracle, the notion of jamming Oracle VM down the throat of a customer in order for them to get Xsigo is just another example of the foolishness of Oracle’s closed, proprietary and arrogant approach. This could not be more at odds with VMware’s notion of the Software Defined Data Center which is completely open with respect to the hardware layers underneath it and the workloads that run on it.

And we are Worried About VMware’s Licensing?

I was reading through a recent article about the new Java 7 release, which contradicts Oracle’s current support statement with respect to licensing. The License from Oracle exclusively states Java 7 is only supported on those hypervisors Oracle currently supports: Oracle VM, VirtualBox, Solaris Containers, and Solaris LDOMs except where noted.    That last phrase is rather tricky, so where do we find such notes. Is the noted the support document stating that they support Oracle products within a VMware VM? Or is it somewhere else in the license? This leaves out all major hypervisors: Citrix, VMware, and Microsoft. If you cannot find a note saying things are supported, somewhere.

This implies quite a bit for the future of Java support within most PaaS environments being built today. In essence, they cannot upgrade to Java 7. Which means they may fall behind. This would impact OpenShift, Amazon, Google, CloudFoundry, SalesForce, and others.

We have various licensing issues to worry about today, some are:

DOJ blocks EMC/VMware from acquiring Virtualization Patents from Novell

EMC, the majority owner of VMware, has agreed with the Department of Justice not to acquire 33 Virtualization Patents from Novell as part of a side-transaction in the acquisition of Novell by Attachmate.  The Statement from the Department of Justice sheds significant light on the deal that had been struck between Novell and a newly-created company formed by Microsoft, EMC, Apple, Oracle to acquire a portfolio of patents for $450M, and the anti-trust threat that the Department of Justice saw to the Open Source community.  And whilst  the spotlight has been on Microsoft’s role, it seems that the role of EMC in seeking to acquire Virtualization patents was at least as concerning to the Department of Justice.

Under the terms of the original deal, at the same time as Attachmate acquired Novell, a newly-formed company called CPTN Holdings would acquire a portfolio of 882 patents from Novell, and then Microsoft, EMC, Apple and Oracle would each acquire some of these patents from CPTN Holdings. Continue reading DOJ blocks EMC/VMware from acquiring Virtualization Patents from Novell

More on OpenStack – Cloud.com, GPL, Citrix, Oracle and the DMTF standards.

If there was an annual prize in the PR industry for the best press release about a “Turkey really looking forward to Thanksgiving”, then it should be won by the PR from Cloud.com as it announced its participation in OpenStack.  Cloud.com’s only asset is an GPL-licensed Open Source IaaS Cloud platform which it sells under “Open Core” licensing (more on this below).  If OpenStack succeeds, this asset is worthless.

However, if you look a little closer, it is clear that the canny investors at Cloud.com have a plan – just before the company becomes completely worthless, sell it for ridiculous amounts of money to Citrix. Surely that won’t work? Continue reading More on OpenStack – Cloud.com, GPL, Citrix, Oracle and the DMTF standards.

Virtualize Java without an Operating System

“Virtual Machine” seems to have two distinct meanings:

  • Sysadmins deal with “system” virtual machines, i.e. guest operating systems running on a VM host.
  • The application programmer generally deals with a “process” virtual machine, such as
    • the Java Virtual Machine
    • the Common Language Runtime (CLR) for .NET

The “process” virtual machine may be running on an operating system which (in turn) may be running as a “system” virtual machine on a VM host.  So, in some sense when we put a .NET application on Windows on Hyper-V (or a Java application on Linux on ESXi) we are actually virtualizing twice. The question arises as to whether we can actually virtualize only once, by putting the CLR or the JVM directly on the VM Host.  In this action of course we remove the operating system. Continue reading Virtualize Java without an Operating System