Articles Tagged with Oracle

That Was the Year That Was: 2016

Image of "2016" on chalkboard, crossed out
Goodbye 2016

After the end of a year, we often pause and reflect to celebrate our successes and to try and gain closure for our failures and tragedies. For many, 2016 has been a horrible year. I am not going to talk about politics, as that is far too contentious, but the world seems a little darker today than it did in January of 2016. We lost music icons like David Bowie, Prince, Rick Parfitt from Status Quo, and George Michael. Comedians Victoria Wood, Caroline Aherne, and Gene Wilder passed away. For the fantasy and science fiction geeks, we lost Alan Rickman (Harry Potter and Galaxy Quest), Carrie Fisher (Star Wars) on Christmas day, and Anton Yelchin (Star Trek) in June. The sporting world lost Muhammad Ali, Arnold Palmer, Johann Cruyff (the founder of Sexy Football—the proper sort with a round ball that is kicked by a foot). We also lost John Glenn, former US senator and astronaut. In the technology world, we lost Intel founding father Andy Grove, email inventor Ray Tomlinson, and AOL co-founder Jim Kimsey.

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Oracle dip into their pockets again this time for Dyn

Oracle have been quietly building out their next generation cloud environments, building up a cloud practice with seasoned professionals that includes Ex-VCE, VMware and AWS personal.  They have released a completely new version of their IaaS layer cloud. Dipping into their not insignificant loose pocket change to make several key purchases or acquisitions this year.

Now in what should be their last acquisition of 2016 they have now acquired Dyn for an undisclosed amount; but according to Dan Primack, a former senior editor at Fortune it is expected to be in the region of $600million.

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Oracle acquires Dyn to bolster their Cloud.

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SaaS Enabler: Oracle Cloud 2.0

After Oracle OpenWorld, I asked myself a simple question. How will Oracle use Oracle Cloud 2.0? AWS uses its cloud to create services such as Lambda. What will Oracle create within its cloud? More to the point, will its current SaaS offerings migrate to Oracle Cloud 2.0? Have they already? These are crucial questions to which there are no ready answers. Oracle cannot compete with Amazon, so how will Oracle become a player in the cloud?

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Is Oracle Cloud 2.0 a Weather System Too Late?

Last week was Oracle OpenWorld. It was held in San Francisco at the Moscone Center, which surprised me. I had thought it was closed for refurbishment, as this was the reason VMware had given for holding its annual US shindig in Las Vegas this year.

It seems like Oracle must always have a public enemy number one. Those of you with long enough teeth will remember spats it has had over the years with Microsoft and, more recently, Google and HPE. Well, it seems that Oracle has a new public enemy in its laser sights, and that is Amazon Web Services (AWS). The OpenWorld keynotes proclaimed that Oracle is now a real cloud player and the fastest growing cloud company out there. However, according to The Register, even the usually docile and compliant conference attendees were quite vociferous in denying this.

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Is Oracle Cloud 2.0 a weather system too late?

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Oracle Buys NetSuite with a $9.3 Billion Dip into Pocket

Oracle is acquiring NetSuite in a $9.3B all-cash purchase. After its very shaky start in cloud computing—Ellison famously stated that the computer industry and its approach to cloud computing are highly fashion driven—the purchase of NetSuite makes a statement. Oracle is now front and center where cloud is concerned, though it is true that it is playing catch-up with the likes of AWS, Google, and Azure, and possibly, with regard to this acquisition, Salesforce. However, unlike VMware, Oracle has not yet appeared to have made any serious missteps in its journey. Oracle’s only choices were to build—and build big and quickly—or to buy its entry point, although Oracle has been building out its cloud infrastructures with data centers in all the major regions of the world. It also recognized that it is very hard to play catch-up. So, unlike VMware, it decided that this was not to be its only route to market.

OracleNetSuite
Oracle loved NetSuite so much that it bought the company

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