Tag Archives: OpenStack

Vyatta: Building Block for Brocade SDN Plans

Vyatta100x30Brocade has stated they will buy Vyatta for an all-cash deal. This is good news for Vyatta and perhaps a way for Brocade to partake of software that could rival VMware’s purchase of Nicira when Vyatta’s own SDN features are married with Brocade Ether Fabric technology. Brocade has been in the software business for a while now, but only with respect to their own hardware. With the acquisition of Vyatta, they will shortly own a building block that can extend Ether Fabric into the virtual and cloud environments. It would be shortsighted to say this is just an SDN play—this purchase shows there is quite a bit of benefit to Brocade. Continue reading Vyatta: Building Block for Brocade SDN Plans

Cisco Nexus 1000v: Free unless you want Security

VirtualizationSecurityWhile not particularly new news, the next version of the Cisco Nexus 1000v will be free, unless you want the security features. This is an interesting shift from Cisco with respect to VMware vCloud Director, the Nicira purchase, furthering UCS, and Cisco within non-UCS data centers. However, given other announcements, with respect to OpenStack, perhaps this is more a play to level the playing field between cloud architectures? But what I find most interesting, is that the changes to the Nexus 1000v also align with the changes we see in the vCloud Suites from VMware. Continue reading Cisco Nexus 1000v: Free unless you want Security

Public Cloud Computing – Economics and Throats to Choke

CloudComputingWhen enterprises consider putting business-critical workloads in public clouds, many of them overlook, at least in part, critical issues of economics and over what portion of their cloud software stack the cloud vendor has full control. This leads to a situation where sometimes relatively inexpensive offerings where the vendor has full control of their software stack (like Amazon EC2) are improperly compared to an offering from a vendor like Savvis or Terramark who is building a cloud out of either VMware-provided components or OpenStack components. This gives rise to important issues that drive both the cost of the respective offerings and the degree to which the cloud vendor can both enhance the offerings with rapid agility and quickly address service level issues. Continue reading Public Cloud Computing – Economics and Throats to Choke

VMware Poised to Accelerate OpenStack Adoption

OpenStack LogoLast week’s inaugural board meeting of the new OpenStack Foundation signaled a change in the organization as Rackspace the driving force behind OpenStack handed control to the newly formed board. Allen Clark director of SUSE was appointed chairman, with Lew Tucker Cisco’s VP and CTO of cloud joining the board as Vice Chairman. Members of the OpenStack community who had voiced concerns that OpenStack’s founder Rackspace’s had too much control over the project should be please by these appointments which are seen as key to establishing OpenStack’s bona fides. Continue reading VMware Poised to Accelerate OpenStack Adoption

VMworld 2012: VMware joins OpenStack

VMworld2012150x27In Open Source it’s impossible to keep a secret (and in any case Anti-Trust laws make it very risky). And despite the imminence of VMworld, the governance processes of OpenStack run to their own timetable, so some interesting news about VMWare was made public on Sunday 26th August – the day before VMWorld – that VMware joins OpenStack.

Continue reading VMworld 2012: VMware joins OpenStack

VMware should merge CloudFoundry with OpenStack

Agile Cloud DevelopmentWe suggest that to ensure CloudFoundry’s dominance, VMware should merge the dominant Open Source IaaS and PaaS initiatives into a single Foundation.

The PaaS market had a major false start in the period 2009 to 2012. The first PaaS vendors came to market with one of two premises

  • “we’ve got a really great platform you can use it if you want to”.  Good examples are Force.com (A PaaS derived from an IaaS – salesforce.com), Google App Engine and the original version of Azure
  •  “it’s a great place to run applications in a particular language” – good examples are Heroku (ruby) and PhpFog (PhP)

Since 2011 a second-generation of PaaS infrastructure has emerged which is exemplified by VMware’s CloudFoundry and Red Hat’s OpenShift. The biggest change between first and second generation PaaS is in the mindset. Instead of the first “P” in Platform as a service referring to “a Platform” it now refers to “any Platform”. In other words the job of the PaaS is to support any application in any language and deliver any set of services that any application might reasonably require. Whilst the first-generation PaaS was generally monolithic, the second-generation PaaS is usually capable of being implemented on a broad range of IaaS and/or virtual infrastructure, and the key factor is openness and diversity. Thus  CloudFoundry can be implemented on OpenStack. Continue reading VMware should merge CloudFoundry with OpenStack