Tag Archives: OpenShift

3rd-Party Application Services – a sign of PaaS maturity

CloudComputingAs mentioned in a number of posts, there is a clear trend away from Platform-specific PaaS (where you write your application to the platform) and Language-Specific PaaS (which provide support to one or possibly a couple of  languages) to Universal PaaS, which is capable of supporting any language and any platform.  There’s a little bit of a gray area, but we would include ActiveState  Stackato,  AppFog, dotCloud, GigaSpaces  Cloudify, Red Hat  OpenShift, Salesforce Heroku, Uhuru Software AppCloud and VMware CloudFoundry in this category. These vendors differentiate themselves by providing a broad range of Application Services or Application Lifecycle Services. Continue reading 3rd-Party Application Services – a sign of PaaS maturity

OpenShift — Pricing and Comparison to AWS

CloudComputingOn June 26, Red Hat announced a new version of OpenShift, and pricing for a future production offering (some time this year). You still can’t buy it but if you were able to buy it you’d know exactly how much it could cost – at least if you could work out what a “gear” is. Pricing allows us to start to compare it more meaningfully with other offerings. However rather than comparing with another PaaS offering, we think most people will be actually considering IaaS as an alternative, so we are going to do that comparison instead.

Continue reading OpenShift — Pricing and Comparison to AWS

Secret Shopper Report – VMware CloudFoundry

To recap the story so far, I’m prototyping an application and deploying it to various PAAS environments. I am not getting any special help from any of the vendors in this exercise – you can think of me as a “secret shopper” for PaaS, although I don’t hide my identity. I am approaching each platform on its own merits, and in these posts I am recounting and contrasting my experiences and reaching some general conclusions about the PaaS market. Continue reading Secret Shopper Report – VMware CloudFoundry

PaaS Platform experience – Red Hat OpenShift

As mentioned in a couple of recent posts, I have been building a prototype application using Open Source technologies that I plan to install on a number of available PaaS cloud platforms.  The application is written in Groovy (with some bits in Java) and built on the Grails framework. The choice to go with this set of technologies is documented in Why would a Developer choose VMware? and my experiences leveraging the Open Source ecosystem around Groovy/Grails is outlined in VMware’s SpringSource Ecosystem

Subsequent to those posts I still feel pretty comfortable about the technology choices, although I have had to move away from the “scaffolded” user interface provided by Grails and build some javascript widgetry that sits in the browser. For this I chose another technology I happen to be familiar with called Dojo. It’s essentially a set of compressed javascript files that can be served out from any web server, or even linked to dynamically at one of three externally-hosted sites. It can be used to make a web application look like a proper enterprise application with menus, tabbed panels, grids and charts etc. I glued it back into the Grails Controller/Domain layer via json and Xhr (Ajax). Continue reading PaaS Platform experience – Red Hat OpenShift

VMware’s CloudFoundry and Red Hat’s OpenShift – Compare and Contrast

Over the last few weeks, VMware (as we indicated in an earlier post) and Red Hat have initiated two very similar initiatives known respectively as CloudFoundry and OpenShift. These are Platform as a Service (PaaS) plays, being developed for the longer term, primarily looking to encourage the development of (and thereafter to provide infrastructure for) applications specificallysuited to the the cloud. In this article we compare and contrast the two offerings and discuss their significance for the PaaS market as a whole. Continue reading VMware’s CloudFoundry and Red Hat’s OpenShift – Compare and Contrast