Tag Archives: Open Source

Red Hat Acquires PaaS Cloud vendor Makara to help compete with VMware’s vFabric

Red Hat announced on November 30, 2010, for an undisclosed sum, the acquisition of startup PaaS vendor, Makara, which provides a deployment platform for most of the Open Source application stacks (Apache, MySQL, PHP, Java, Tomcat and JBoss) onto most of the IaaS cloud infrastructures (Amazon EC2,   Amazon VPC,  Rackspace Cloud, VMware vCloud, Terremark, Cloud.com and Eucalyptus). Makara is not  open source, although the company was committed to open sourcing in due course, and Red Hat is aiming to accelerate that process. Continue reading Red Hat Acquires PaaS Cloud vendor Makara to help compete with VMware’s vFabric

OpenStack on Hyper-V – Microsoft does Public Cloud Interoperability

On October 22nd, Microsoft announced that it has partnered with Cloud.com to provide integration and support of Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V to the OpenStack project. The announcement caused a great deal of interest here at the Virtualization Practice, as it signals an unexpected willingness on Microsoft’s part to pursue interoperability at the IaaS layer, allowing users to break out of the Hyper-v stack, whilst still retaining Hyper-v at the bottom. The fact this announcement came from Microsoft (not Cloud.com, Rackspace or OpenStack) seems to signal the seriousness of the intent.

In practical terms this means that Cloud.com puts a Hypervisor Abstraction Layer into the bottom of the OpenStack compute platform (Nova), and binds Hyper-V into that, to allow images to be deployed to and controlled on Hyper-V from OpenStack, using tooling that speaks one or other of the two OpenStack APIs (Native or Amazon EC2). Technically it is not a major step because although the initial version of Nova targeted libvirt and thereby Xen, KVM and Qemu, Citrix had already succceeded in providing a hypervisor abstraction layer in OpenStack for XenServer. Continue reading OpenStack on Hyper-V – Microsoft does Public Cloud Interoperability

Rationalizing the NRE Cloud Alliance – newScale, rPath and Eucalyptus

We’ve been following Eucalyptus for some time, and they recently invited us to a briefing about a new alliance called NRE, which is a credible group of independent vendors, newScale, rPath and Eucalyptus.

This wasn’t spun  from an Open Source prespective and it was interesting to see the Eucalyptus positioning to the general marketplace.  Eucalyptus is positioned as the “leading” Open Source cloud, the benefit of Open Source being it is “on your own terms”.  It offers IAAS in the data center, just like Amazon Web Services.  It is Elastic, based on industry standard APIs, hypervisor agnostic, supports both Windows & Linux guests, and has a huge ecosystem.  It’s the elasticity and the scalability that are driving the adoption. Pricing is secondary, and you also get the feeling that it’s not traditional enterprises which are picking it up. Continue reading Rationalizing the NRE Cloud Alliance – newScale, rPath and Eucalyptus

Ubuntu edging towards OpenStack

Around this time last year we were tracking the development of the Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud, a Eucalyptus-based solution that is bundled into the Ubuntu installation from 9.10  onwards and allows you to install a IaaS cloud into which you subsequently install Ubuntu Server instances, rather than directly installing an Ubuntu Server. The Eucalyptus proposition is that the cloud you create is identical from an API – and therefore a tooling – perspective  to an Amazon EC2 cloud, and the same Ubuntu instances can run inside  it, and even can be cloud-bursted out to it.  Canonical make a lot of this duality in their positioning of Eucalyptus and the Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud. It feels very-much like an “onramp” message that we hear from VMware. Continue reading Ubuntu edging towards OpenStack

Rackspace Hijacks OpenStack

Call me a bore, but Open Source Governance models would be my “Specialist Subject” on a quiz show.  It’s not that I have studied Open Source Governance, it’s more that I have lived it. A s a member of the Board of Directors of Eclipse I worked extensively with both Skip McGaughey who originally set up Eclipse as an entity inside IBM, and with Mike Milinkovich who took it over as an independent entity, and I know the pain that the originating organization has to go through to let go of its baby, and the pain that an independent director goes through to finally wrest the baby from its parent’s grasp, and the benefits to the originating organization and to the community at large when it all happens.  I also know that Rackspace has gone through none of that pain in setting up OpenStack,  it has got the OpenStack governance model spectacularly wrong, and as a result the whole initiative is in peril.

The OpenStack Governance Document bears an uncanny resemblance to George Orwell’s Animal Farm.  You may remember that various animals got together to throw out the humans with the slogan “All Animals are Equal”, but that over time the slogan migrated to “All Animals Are Equal, but some are More Equal than Others” as the Pigs gained control and became indistinguishable from the humans they threw out.  OpenStack was created with a similar sentiment: let’s throw out Eucalyptus and create a community programme where all contributors are equal. What has emerged in the governance model is  “All Contributors are Equal, but Rackspace is more equal than others”.  All the key positions, and a majority on the decision-making bodies are reserved for Rackspace.  Rackspace, like the Pigs in Animal Farm, has subverted the revolution. Continue reading Rackspace Hijacks OpenStack

Why Cloud.com is NOT a drowning turkey

We recently annoyed Peder Ulander of Cloud.com by suggesting when Cloud.com joined OpenStack it was a Turkey waiting for Thanksgiving.  It wasn’t personal, but we do understand that being compared to a fat bird with a big neck can cause offense.  To calm things down we spoke to Peder, and we thought Virtualization Practice readers might be interested in the conversation. Continue reading Why Cloud.com is NOT a drowning turkey