Articles Tagged with NSX

Network Virtualization

NSX Release … and Availability?

Network Virtualization

VMware just released details about the latest version of NSX—6.2.2. What is interesting about this release is that it is the first that is split into tiers. The release pages are full featured, and although pricing doesn’t appear to be available yet on the website, hopefully this will be a fully public release that doesn’t require jumping through hoops to get. Since VMware acquired Nicira in 2012, the NSX product has been a bit of a dark horse, kept well stabled and not allowed out to run free. The product has been available only to selected customers and partners, presumably with high-volume sales that will support a large amount of VMware employee time in each deployment.

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Network Virtualization

The Godfather of NSX Leaves His Baby in Good Hands to Help Other Embryos

Network Virtualization
VMwareNSX
Casado’s Baby NSX

In a shock announcement on Wednesday, Martin Casado announced that he was leaving VMware’s Networking and Security business unit, the group that owns the NSX product, to join the venture capitalist firm Andreessen Horowitz as a general partner. Casado was co-founder and CTO of Nicira, the network company that VMware brought for $1.2 billion in 2012.

This closes the circle for Martin, whose first institutional investor at Nicira was Andreessen Horowitz. Ben Horowitz of the company served on Nicira’s board and acted as Casado’s business mentor.

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Network Virtualization

On Complexity

Network Virtualization

A few weeks ago, Hany Michael released a blog post on his NSX lab network. Embedded within is one of the most brilliantly clear diagrams of a very complex situation I’ve ever seen. It takes a level of skill to achieve the clarity of this diagram. What hit me, though, is the sheer level of complexity that Hany conveys in this document and how that complexity is inherent to the SDDC. Its easy to argue that the diagram shows the smallest possible instance of an SDDC (except it skims over the storage). Not too surprising, as its an SDDC lab. Its inherently VMware focused, but it could be applied to Hyper-V or OpenStack easily. Each function in the diagram would still be necessary, although some would switch or merge. This article will be quite VMware focused for this reason.

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Network Virtualization

The Edge in Sight?

Network Virtualization

In networking, as in life, we often use the same terms to mean many different things. One of the biggest culprits of this in networking is “edge.” An edge device is usually considered to be a device that connects into a network in only one place. Traffic can flow from an edge device, or it can flow to an edge device, but it can never, ever flow through an edge device. I say never—thats not entirely true, but I’ll get back to that later. In a campus network, the edge devices are things like users computers, laptops, and printers; mobile phones; and tablets.

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Network Virtualization

It’s All about Microsegmentation

Network Virtualization

For the last eighteen months, VMware has been pushing NSX as the third pillar of its software-defined data center (SDDC). NSX has three big selling points that VMware promotes: taking control of the network, automation and orchestration, and microsegmentation. The first two are standard SDDC fare: first, pull the function into software, abstract where necessary, and orchestrate to bring operational advantage; second, break down silos and allow a more agile approach. But the last, microsegmentation, is a good place to focus for a moment.

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vmworld2015

VMworld US 2015: Day 2 Recap

vmworld2015

Welcome to The Virtualization Practice’s week-long coverage of VMworld US 2015. Tune in all week for our daily recap of the major announcements and highlights from the world’s premier virtualization and cloud conference.

VMworld US 2015 continued in force yesterday, beginning with a long but powerful general session/keynote talk. Carl Eschenbach, VMware’s president and COO, set the stage for a slew of announcements around VMware’s “One Cloud, Any Application, Any Device” approach to computing and a seamless federation of all types of clouds, supporting both traditional and new cloud-native applications. A variety of VMware leaders joined him on stage to talk about the various aspects of these announcements and how they mesh with their overall strategy. While each of these areas could give rise a whole series of posts by themselves, I’ll summarize the major points.

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