Tag Archives: Migration

IT Transformation: Migration

CloudComputingIn previous articles, we discussed IT transformation in general, IT transformation and security, and the top-down approach to IT transformation. In this article, we discuss migration as a means to IT transformation. Migration as a means to IT transformation hooks into an organization’s disaster recovery procedures, using these existing mechanisms to migrate workloads from on-premises to in-cloud. At that point, the migration can continue to power on workloads to take over for those on-premises, to run side-by-side with what is on-premises, to run cooperatively with those on-premises, or to just be ready in case a disaster requires their use. The fact is that cloud can be a fairly large cost saver over maintaining a hot site within another data center. Instead, you maintain one in the cloud. Continue reading IT Transformation: Migration

Are There Greenfield Deployments of Virtual and Cloud Environments?

DataCenterVirtualizationLet me start out by saying that I see more discussions about greenfield deployments of products than I do of migration/integration by vendors. Personally, I think there is no such thing as a greenfield deployment unless the organization is just starting out, creating a brand new data center, or perhaps has money to waste. In most cases, what is defined as greenfield is really just a grain of sand on an island of technology that still needs to integrate into the greater organization. As such, that integration should be the foremost thought when products are developed. But instead, it is not, and effort goes into becoming that island or into a replacement install that is still an island.

Continue reading Are There Greenfield Deployments of Virtual and Cloud Environments?

Public Cloud Use Cases

CloudComputingThere are different public cloud use cases. Here at The Virtualization Practice we moved our datacenter from the north to the south part of the country and utilized the cloud to host the workloads during the transition.  Edward Haletky, yesterday posted about Evaluating the Cloud: Keeping your Cloud Presence and presented the question and his thoughts of is it worth staying in the cloud or bringing the data home. Continue reading Public Cloud Use Cases

Browsium Ion: time to get going from IE6?

Reports on IE6’s death are often greatly exaggerated. A number of sites do offer statistics for consumer Internet browser share, but enterprise users are another breed and have a different browser use profile: IE6 is still there alive and well in a large swathe of enterprise desktops. This puts a risk on projects that look to move an organisation beyond Windows XP.

To address this, Browsium have built on their experience in providing a solution to IE6 compatibility to launch Browsium Ion. Browsium have designed Ion to enable IE6 and IE7-dependent web applications to run unmodified in an IE8 or IE9 tab.

The end of life for IE6 is tied to Microsoft XP/Server 2003.. the clock ticks to 2014. Can Ion address the compatibility problems for corporates and still stay on the right side of Redmond? Will Browsium Ion get migration projects shackled by a reliance on IE6 going?

Continue reading Browsium Ion: time to get going from IE6?

Year in Review – Moving to the Cloud?

The “cloud” has become quite the buzz word and in all appearances truly loved by the marketing side of the fence also.  “Take it to the cloud.”  That is one of my favorite lines from a Microsoft commercial campaign that I think really shows how mainstream the cloud has become.   Facebook, iTunes, Twitter, Oxygen, Amazon and Acronis are all examples of different cloud services that I connect to on a regular basis. Services for the end users are becoming more and more abundant, which is absolutely fantastic for us, the consumer.

Is the corporate adaptation of the cloud moving at the same speed?   

Continue reading Year in Review – Moving to the Cloud?

VMware Capacity Planner – A Special Use Case

I have had the opportunity to perform a few VMware Capacity Planner assessments over the years and I have been, more the most part, pretty happy with the process and the results of the reports.  The assessment is really pretty straight forward.  We had physical servers to the project, making sure we have proper permissions to perform all the tasks and then let the process run over an extended period of time.  For the most part, this way of sampling over an extended time frame will give you a very good idea what can be virtualized and the number of hosts that will be needed. Continue reading VMware Capacity Planner – A Special Use Case