Tag Archives: LiquidWare Labs

Some Thoughts on the Last Decade and 2011 in Review

I cannot believe the month of December is almost upon us.  Every year around this time I like to reflect upon the year and give my review and remarks.  This is a special year for me because it was around this time a decade ago that I was introduced to a cool new technology called virtualization from this neat new product called VMware Workstation. It was a magical moment when I first discovered the ability to run multiple operating systems, at the same time, on a single computer.  I remember this moment well because it was true love at first install.  Within a year I was playing with VMware ESX Server 1.5 and was given my first virtualization proof of concept that was followed by my first production design and deployment. The rest, as they say, is history as well as an amazing ride. On to 2011 in Review. Continue reading Some Thoughts on the Last Decade and 2011 in Review

VMware’s Rapid Desktop Program: Pivot3 vSTAC VDI appliance delivers early

The agility and scalability of virtual desktops enable use cases that are not possible with a  physical desktop environment. However, introducing a virtual desktop infrastructure is complex. Time-scales can be long, resource requirements high.

In an effort to relieve the discomfort for customers and partners VMware have introduced a Rapid Desktop Program. This program looks to validate View Proof of Concept appliances to ensure that they meet criteria for performance and reliability. By removing the complexity of the “I”, an organisation can focus better on the assessment of virtual desktops and in turn deliver faster .

Pivotv3  are the first to  release an appliance that has been validated by the Rapid Desktop Program. How does Pivot3’svSTAC VDI allow you to overcome common issues with VDI projects? Is this likely to improve take-up of VDI? And, this is an  appliance, such devices are normally associated with big enterprise solutions – is this only a big enterprise solution?

Consumerization of IT: AppSense and Centrix Software alliance recognise its more than just “how can my CFO justify their iPad”?

You know you’re not going to have a good day when your father, rather than offering you the chance to rule the galaxy by his side, announces your demise. In 1981 Mark Dean was part of the IBM team that delivered the Personal Computer (PC): yet Mr Dean has looked at his stricken progeny, clinging afraid and alone above an abyss and said – “do you know what, I’d prefer a tablet”.

In the past 30 years the PC has been a device that has been adopted by both the consumer and corporate markets. Back in the day, applications were supplied from a centralised cloud service, billed on usage: users accessed that service via a thin client. “Personalisation”, indeed “getting processing time” was complex. A young upstart company called Apple introduced the Apple II. It may have started as a consumer device, but the PC was rapidly adopted as a corporate IT tool to drive agility and productivity. In this galaxy, not so long ago, IT literate users railed against expensive and rigid mainframes and demanded… a PC. They got it. Arguably, corporate IT departments have spent thirty years trying to rest back some semblance of control and help the businesses accommodate the high costs of unmanaged and chaotic environments.

AppSense, a leading provider of user virtualization technology, and Centrix Software, provider of unified end-user computing solutions, have announced a strategic partnership to provide organizations with a comprehensive, user-centric transformation program. Do you need a user-centric transformation program? How could this alliance help your business manage IT beyond the ‘single-PC-for-every-user’ era? If they can help you, are they your only hope? Will it justify your CFO’s iPad?

Continue reading Consumerization of IT: AppSense and Centrix Software alliance recognise its more than just “how can my CFO justify their iPad”?

Quick Recap of VMworld 2011

My pilgrimage from VMworld 2011 in Las Vegas has come to an end. In my humble opinion, this has been the week for the storage side of things with some amazing and interesting new stuff that has been released or is about to be released. There has been some really cool stuff that is working with SSD and storage. Continue reading Quick Recap of VMworld 2011

Performance Management for Desktop Virtualization (VDI) and Presentation Virtualization (SBC)

CIOs see selecting the right technology provider for their desktop virtualization strategy as a “significant risk”, according to research firm Ovum.  Ovum found that simplifying the management of desktops to reduce costs and increasing business agility were the top two reasons for implementing desktop virtualization, however,  an often overlooked aspect is the need to shift thinking from a device-centric perspective to a user-centric one.

Continue reading Performance Management for Desktop Virtualization (VDI) and Presentation Virtualization (SBC)

What is User Virtualization and is it worth $70 million?

70 million individual dollars can buy you a lot of things.  A 64 metre long super yacht. The services of an NFL linesman for two years. For $70  million you could entice an  English Premier League striker to play for you, but not necessarily score goals. $70  million is 113,000 Apple iPads. If you spent $100 a day, it’d take you nearly 1,950 years to get fritter it away.  Yet despite all these glittering prizes and goals, Goldman Sachs chose to invest their $70million in a chunk of AppSense.

Of all the things they could have invested in, why did choose AppSense? If the future is going to be full of cloud services, virtualised desktops, and mobile devices, why spend a not inconsiderable sum on something that sounds the stuff of science fiction?

What is User Virtualization and is it worth a $70 million dollar investment? Why would you need user virtualization? And indeed what makes AppSense stand out?

Continue reading What is User Virtualization and is it worth $70 million?