Tag Archives: KVM

Virtual Thoughts: Is the Hypervisor moving into Hardware?

During the Virtual Thoughts podcast on 6/29/2010, the analysts discussed various hardware aspects of virtualization trying to determine if the hypervisor was to move into the hardware? and if so how much of it? as well as whose hypervisor? and lastly such a move part of any business model?

Virtual Thoughts is a monthly podcast that looks at the entire scope of virtualization to discuss new trends and thoughts within the virtualization and cloud communities. Continue reading Virtual Thoughts: Is the Hypervisor moving into Hardware?

KVM in SUSE, what is going on at Novell?

As of Service Pack 1,  SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 11 (SLES) supports KVM. The bald facts are as follows.  SLES 11 SP1 is based on a 2.6.32 kernel and is now full supported on x86_64 processors which support hardware virtualization, for the following guest operating systems:

  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 11 SP1
  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10 SP3
  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 9 SP4

We note there is no mention of other Linux guests or Windows guests. This post follows on from our previous post regarding the demise of Xen in Red Hat Enterprise Linux, and perhaps suggests the beginning of the end for Xen-based virtualization in Linux, but the story is far from clear. Continue reading KVM in SUSE, what is going on at Novell?

Growth of Citrix and Hyper-V EcoSystems

PhD Virtual has gained its second round of funding with investment from Citrix amongst others as discussed within our post News: esXpress is no more but what does this mean for XenServer? Up until this point it looked like Citrix was out of the server hypervisor wars and backing Microsoft’s Hyper-V play. Yet this looks on the surface like a basic shift to that direction. Yes, XenServer was placed into the OpenSource community and the latest improvements, such as the Open VSwitch integration and a new releases emphatically say that XenServer is alive and well and that its ecosystem is growing for that matter so is Hyper-V’s.

There are now many more products on the market that not only cater to VMware but Hyper-V and Citrix XenServer, Xen, and with that KVM. Some of these tools are well known in the virtualization community while others are not. This is a list of tools that have specific code and integrations for each of the listed hypervisors, not ones that naturally work with all hypervisors such as many APM and other Performance Management solutions, that is a different type of list. Continue reading Growth of Citrix and Hyper-V EcoSystems

VMware – Product, Architecture, or Culture?

As the year draws to a close the tendency is to both reflect upon the past and to try to anticipate what the next year is to bring. Thinking about our industry (Virtualization and Cloud Computing) in this way raises some interesting questions that are worth exploring.

Is VMware a Product?

This question more fully stated really means is VMware vSphere really over the long term a product which currently leads a new category of products, or is it destined to become a feature of some broader and more established offering? If we look back over the last few years, it is clear that VMware ESX and now vSphere have established the start of a new product category. Other products in this category include Microsoft Hyper-V, Citrix Xen, Red Hat KVM, and if one goes outside of x86 virtualization, IBM Power VM. Continue reading VMware – Product, Architecture, or Culture?

The Hypervisor Wars, a 2000-year old story

“Thus it is that in war the victorious strategist only seeks battle after the victory has been won, whereas he who is destined to defeat first fights and afterwards looks for victory.”

Sun Tzu, “The art of war”, written between 476 and 221 BC (approximately)

In the fog of the datacenter virtualization war, it is difficult to see clearly who will end up on top, and yet the outcome is almost certainly determined, and the victorious generals are even now moving on to fight new battles. Here at the Virtualization Practice we too would like to think we can see through the fog to work out who has won, so here are our thoughts, take account of them as you wish.  They concern, primarily, the big four protagonists:  Microsoft/Hyper-V, Citrix /Xen, VMware/vSphere and Red Hat/KVM. Continue reading The Hypervisor Wars, a 2000-year old story