Tag Archives: Hybrid Cloud

Is SDDC a Product or a Mindset?

Bask to Basics - Secure Hybrid CloudMy response to Stephen Foskett’s tweet of a post about the Software-Defined Data Center (SDDC) Symposium led to an interesting conversation about the nature of the SDDC—what it is, what it is not, and why we should care. The software-defined data center is considered by some to be an instrument of vendor lock-in, vaporware, or in many ways just marketing hype. “SDDC” has many different definitions, but I do not believe it reflects any of those commonly used. Instead, I hold that it is a way of thinking, a way of looking at the new world of IT in which we live. This has sparked a quite an interesting Twitter conversation between many interested parties.  Continue reading Is SDDC a Product or a Mindset?

Extending the Cloud Outside of the Data Center

CloudComputingVMware has been aggressively building and executing its hybrid cloud vision, extending the cloud outside of the data center. In line with this vision, VMware recently announced an expansion of its VMware vCloud Hybrid Service by adding disaster recovery as one of its offered services. This expansion will put VMware in direct competition with companies like IBM, Sungard AS, Amazon, Rackspace, Zerto, and others in the Recovery as a Service space.

Continue reading Extending the Cloud Outside of the Data Center

The Cloud: Looking Forward

CloudComputingIt is the day after Thanksgiving in the United States, and as technologists, we have quite a bit for which to be thankful, as we live in interesting times. We live between the computing that was (mainframes, PCs, etc.) and the computing of tomorrow (fully functioning cloud). We live within a hybrid world. We are no longer chained to our desks with their big and clunky terminals or computers, but instead we can roam freely around the world (and even into the atmosphere), accessing anything we want, including pictures, files, data, documents, and more (even those pesky cats that inhabit the Internet). With such access comes great power, and with great power comes responsibility. Continue reading The Cloud: Looking Forward

Moving Past the OpenStack API Debate

OpenStack LogoThere has been a great deal of passionate debate over the last few months within the OpenStack community. There is one camp that is advocating for building APIs that are compatible with Amazon Web Services (AWS) APIs, while the other camp argues for augmenting the existing OpenStack APIs. Those in favor of making the APIs more compatible with AWS are focused on standardization and compatibility between OpenStack and AWS. Standardizing on the AWS APIs makes moving workloads between OpenStack and AWS clouds easier, thus giving OpenStack a competitive advantage over other private cloud stacks. It also makes it easier for customers to move workloads off of AWS (public cloud) to OpenStack (private cloud) for customers wanting to deploy on bare metal machines, keep critical data out of the public cloud, or have the flexibility to target a cloud endpoint based on their customers’ desires (for those delivering solutions to customers outside of their enterprise). Continue reading Moving Past the OpenStack API Debate

What Has Nirvanix Done and What Would You Do

CloudComputingWhat has Nirvanix done and what would you do?

Let me paint a scenario for you. You’re virtual/cloud computing environment is just plain rocking. This environment is a well-oiled machine capable of handling all your company’s needs, but you still find yourself in need of extra resources at times and make the leap into a hybrid cloud configuration.  Everything is going well, really well, actually, and you have moved more and more resources into your hybrid space. Life is good…Up until you receive your two weeks’ notice; now the fun really begins. Not really. Continue reading What Has Nirvanix Done and What Would You Do

Big Data Security

CloudComputingAt the recent Misti Big Data Security conference many forms of securing big data were discussed from encrypting the entire big data pool to just encrypting the critical bits of data within the pool.  On several of the talks there was general discussion on securing Hadoop as well as access to the pool of data. These security measures include RBAC, encryption of data in motion between hadoop nodes as well as tokenization or encryption on ingest of data. What was missing was greater control of who can access specific data once that data was in the pool. How could role based access controls by datum be put into effect? Is such protection too expensive given the time critical nature of analytics or are there other ways to implement datum security? Continue reading Big Data Security