Tag Archives: High Availability

Deploying in the Cloud: Lessons When Clouds Burst

ThunderstormOrganizations are increasingly deploying in the cloud; moving applications from datacenters to the cloud or creating new applications for the cloud. Today, clouds convey an image of high availability, reliability and scalability unsurpassed in computing history. With sophisticated technology and advanced practices, vendors portray their SaaS, IaaS and PaaS solutions built “in the cloud” as almost impermeable to disasters and other acts of God.

Except when they’re not. Continue reading Deploying in the Cloud: Lessons When Clouds Burst

A Look at Stratus Technology

There used to be a FedEx commercial that had a saying “when it just has to be there overnight”. What if we did a play on words and changed the saying to work with Fault-Tolerance and or High Availability.  The saying would be something like “when it just has to remain running overnight”.

Every business environment today demands both performance and ultra-high availability.  When working with virtual environments some high availability options are included already with the ability to restart any virtual machines that were running on a host that failed and crashed.  This still has limitations in that the virtual machine would still need to be restarted and this in itself still has some downtime.  The amount of downtime can vary depending on variables with things like the number of virtual machines to be restarted and the number of hosts available to handle the virtual machines restarting.  Downtime could be as quick as five minutes or as long as thirty minutes depending on the variables. Continue reading A Look at Stratus Technology

vSphere 4.1 Improvements in Availability

With the release of vSphere 4.1 there have been some great enhancements that have been added with this release.  In one of my earlier post I took a look at the vSphere 4.1 release of ESXi.  This post I am going to take a look at vSphere 4.1 availability options and enhancements. So what has changed with this release?  A maximum of 320 virtual machines per host has been firmly set.  In vSphere 4.0 there were different VM/Host limitations for DRS as well as different rules for VMware HA. VMware has also raised the number of virtual machines that can be run in a single cluster from 1280 in 4.0 to 3000 in the vSphere 4.1 release. How do these improvements affect your upgrade planning? Continue reading vSphere 4.1 Improvements in Availability

EMC Hints at Storage Technology Breakthrough in VMworld Demo

While a demonstration session at VMworld 2009 in San Francisco attracted much attention from the network and server virtualization community, it curiously got little attention from their storage counterparts. However, the demo showed what may be an important technical advance — a possible solution to the long-distance cache coherency and distributed lock management problem that has plagued the industry for decades — with little fanfare. If so, the storage vendor community should be taking more careful notice. A video of this standing-room-only session is available at Blip TV link. Continue reading EMC Hints at Storage Technology Breakthrough in VMworld Demo