Tag Archives: Grails

PaaS Platform experience – Red Hat OpenShift

As mentioned in a couple of recent posts, I have been building a prototype application using Open Source technologies that I plan to install on a number of available PaaS cloud platforms.  The application is written in Groovy (with some bits in Java) and built on the Grails framework. The choice to go with this set of technologies is documented in Why would a Developer choose VMware? and my experiences leveraging the Open Source ecosystem around Groovy/Grails is outlined in VMware’s SpringSource Ecosystem

Subsequent to those posts I still feel pretty comfortable about the technology choices, although I have had to move away from the “scaffolded” user interface provided by Grails and build some javascript widgetry that sits in the browser. For this I chose another technology I happen to be familiar with called Dojo. It’s essentially a set of compressed javascript files that can be served out from any web server, or even linked to dynamically at one of three externally-hosted sites. It can be used to make a web application look like a proper enterprise application with menus, tabbed panels, grids and charts etc. I glued it back into the Grails Controller/Domain layer via json and Xhr (Ajax). Continue reading PaaS Platform experience – Red Hat OpenShift

VMware’s SpringSource Ecosystem

As mentioned in my previous piece I’ve been doing some prototyping using SpringSource’s Grails. Grails can be thought of as the top of the stack.  If you pick up Grails you would naturally pull in the other pieces of SpringSource, including vFabric and ultimately CloudFoundry.   In a future post I will deal with what happens when you stick Grails onto CloudFoundry, but at this stage I’ve been assessing the health of the SpringSource Ecosystem. Continue reading VMware’s SpringSource Ecosystem

Why would a Developer choose VMware?

It is interesting to see Edward’s comment that according to EMC/VMware, widespread production deployment of Cloud Apps is 3-5 years off.  If that is the case the VMware CloudFoundry initiative should be focused on cutting-edge development rather than porting existing apps, and in much the same way that Microsoft has always courted developers, CloudFoundry should be the latest cool thing for developer productivity. It’s interesting to talk about this stuff in the abstract, and at the strategic level, but sometimes it’s worth understanding what happens when you need to make the decisions for yourself.

So, although I’m more of an Architect than a Developer I’m knocking up a prototype application – this isn’t a thought experiment I really am building a real prototype with a view to showing to a real enterprise customer (in fact several), but it’s not being built for one specific customer so there aren’t any pre-defined corporate standards on the technology that I have to build it on.  Continue reading Why would a Developer choose VMware?

VMworld from an Open Source Perspective

VMworld is clearly the largest dedicated virtualization conference, and yet from an Open Source perspective it is slightly disappointing because the VMware ecosystem naturally attracts proprietary software vendors, and also some of the more interesting activities in Open Source are through multi-vendor foundations which do not have the same marketing budgets as vendors themselves.

Nevertheless, there are a number of key Open Source players, and some interesting smaller players, represented at VMworld.
Continue reading VMworld from an Open Source Perspective