Tag Archives: EOP

Mobile Virtual Desktops, Motorola Announce a Nirvana Phone

Early last week Darron Antill, COO at AppSense, predicted that 2011 will be a huge year for mobility, citing that by 2013 mobile phones will overtake PCs as the most common web access device worldwide. Before that week was out, Motorola announced the introduction of its hyperphone; the Motorola ATRIX 4G. As you look up from your iPads, Playbooks and Slates “oh my” you may well ask, “is this important?” Continue reading Mobile Virtual Desktops, Motorola Announce a Nirvana Phone

Presentation Virtualization, a year in review

PresentationVirtualizationWay back in January, when 2010 still had that showroom fresh smell we released Presentation Virtualization Solutions whitepaper; the year wasn’t half way through before that was updated and its being defrosted as we speak to enable updates going into 2011. Its been an eventful year for Presentation Virtualization. Continue reading Presentation Virtualization, a year in review

Presentation Virtualization: what can VMworld do for me lately?

VMworld is clearly a Very Big Virtualization Conference – possibly the largest. Yet, does it cover all virtualization topics? If you’re from a  Presentation Virtualization (PV) background (although  maybe you know it as Terminal Services (TS); possibly even a Microsoft Remote Desktop Services (RDS); heck lets go on an old school ‘server based computing’ perspective):

‘what could VMworld do for me?’

The answer is:

“Quite a lot.”

I know: you’re shocked: I was bemused too. From a PV perspective there are a number of vendors worth your while to to go and see. I’m not going: wish I was now.

Continue reading Presentation Virtualization: what can VMworld do for me lately?

Will Your VDI Solution Support your Remote Users?

It is said that VDI as a concept is straightforward and a compelling proposition. Centralise your services to reduce the desktop management complexity and enable a more cost-effective method of updating desktops. In addition to this, the option to support branch office/remote users from a centralised location can also allow you to reassess network link costs between sites, and indeed VDI allows you to deliver greater productivity through “anywhere, any time” universal access.

In centralising desktop services there’s obviously a requirement to understand the performance and operation of your applications in a virtual host – but, proving that the VDI implementation works technically will be for nothing if you have users who have a poor experience of using the shiny new VDI solution. Indeed, with the rise of mobility, either on mobile devices such as Apple’s iPad or on Microsoft Windows netbooks connected through 3G cards, companies will increasingly rely on networks that experience higher latency and packet loss than on a LAN.

If your organisation has remote users – consider that the impact of centralisation on their desktop experience can be very different: and not always in a happy way.

Continue reading Will Your VDI Solution Support your Remote Users?