Tag Archives: DevOps

Complexity and Cloud-Native Applications

agilecloudSteve Flanders (@smflanders) and I had a late-night Twitter conversation over the complexities inherent in cloud-native applications. My take was that we need to broaden our view and see the entire picture before we can delve into the weeds. Steve’s was that we need DevOps. I countered by saying we need better communication. In essence, we may have been saying the same thing, but we were on different planets, which led to a useful analogy. During the race to the moon, who were the systems engineers, the ones who saw the big picture of a program with well over 15 million moving parts, not to say people, involved?

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Support in the 21st Century: Bringing About Change

BusinessAgilityIn my first article of this series on Support in the 21st Century, I laid out my thoughts about the baseline expectations for the corporate support model and structure established at most companies. This is where I first brought up technology silos and presented the correlation between the number of technology silos and the size of the infrastructure.

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DevOps and the Agile Enterprise Framework

BusinessAgilityI wrote a couple of articles many years back about building an agile and flexible enterprise using a set of models, principles, and design rules that address the need to maximize financial return, improve performance, minimize risk, and enhance business agility. I want to revisit the premise of that article and view it through the lens of DevOps.

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DevOps Requires OpsDev: It Is Time for a Change

agilecloudThere is a huge disconnect between the DevOps world and most current enterprise IT organizations. One element in the gap is that developers do not want to know about infrastructure. Another is that the operations team does not trust developers to make changes to the production infrastructure. Developers want to focus on their application and the value it delivers to the organization. Developers want to know the characteristics of the infrastructure but do not want to build it or operate it. As a result, DevOps does not mean the end of the operations team. In fact, I see the reverse as being essential. The operations team is absolutely critical to the success of DevOps methodologies. The developers must be able to trust that the infrastructure has specific characteristics: characteristics like performance, connectivity, availability, and uniformity. To enable this trust, I believe that the operations teams are going to need to become more like developers. I call this OpsDev.

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Recap of CloudBees Jenkins User Conference

JenkinsWorldConfI was at the Santa Clara Convention Center, next to the beautiful brand-new San Francisco 49ers stadium, this week to listen to two days of discussions about continuous delivery and Jenkins. Keynote speakers were Kohsuke Kawaguchi, creator of Jenkins and CTO at CloudBees, and Gene Kim, coauthor of The Phoenix Project and well-known speaker on DevOps. Continue reading Recap of CloudBees Jenkins User Conference

VMworld US 2015: Day 5 Recap

vmworld2015Welcome to The Virtualization Practice’s week-long coverage of VMworld US 2015. This is the final installment; see Day 1, Day 2, and Day 3, and Day 4 for additional coverage.

VMworld US 2015 wrapped up yesterday with an abbreviated day of hands-on labs and breakout sessions, many of which were repeats of popular sessions from earlier in the week. The vendor showcase is closed on the last day of VMworld, and the mood is that of a ghost town, with many folks having flown out or using the last day to see some of San Francisco. Regardless, with many people gone, it is an ideal time to do Hands-on Labs without waiting in line.

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