Articles Tagged with Desktop Virtualization

DesktopVirtualization

Amazon WorkSpaces Furthers Desktop-as-a-Service Validity

DesktopVirtualizationLast week at the Amazon Web Services (AWS) re:Invent conference, AWS announced two new service offerings that focus on end user computing: AppStream, an application streaming solution that provides a platform for delivering applications to online and offline devices, and WorkSpaces, a Desktop-as-a-Service (DaaS) product. The WorkSpaces announcement took the financial markets by surprise, leaving them wondering about the future of Citrix’s and VMware’s positions in the DaaS marketplace. Citrix, which is already an established delivery partner with Amazon, has been white-labeling XenDesktop services with service providers for some time now, and VMware’s momentum is only growing with the purchase of Desktone last month. The best takeaway from this announcement is that we are seeing the demand and availability of DaaS solutions on the rise.

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DesktopVirtualization

Client Hypervisors: Intelligent Desktop Virtualization too clever for its own good?

DesktopVirtualizationIn 2011, we asked if  Client Hypervisors will drive will the Next Generation Desktop. Yet, other desktop virtualization industry experts, such as Ron Oglesby, decided the technology was a dead man walking, writing off Type 1 Client  Hypervisors.

Fight? Fight? Fight?

While VMware moved away from client hypervisors, they had to agree that an end user compute device strategy must encompass non-VDI. Their Mirage technology can be considered desktop virtualization, but it is not a client hypervisor. Client hypervisor vendors such as Citrix (who subsumed Virtual Computer’s NxTop) , MokaFive, Parallels, Virtual Bridges and joined by Zirtu. Organisations like  WorldView look to innovate on desktop vitualization through containers rather than full virtualization.

Tablets. Touch Screen capable laptops. Hybrid devices with detachable screens. The netbook might be dead, or they could just be resting. The presence of tablets has undeniably shaken the netbook market but businesses still need powerful, capable laptops.

Bring Your Own Pencil aside – there is still a need to manage “stuff”: still large and small organisations who need to manage the delivery of IT including the end device. The question remains how are devices, and the all important data and applications on them, managed? Hosted and session based desktops have their place – but offline capable device requirements will remain.  Is Intelligent Desktop Virtualization the same as client hypervisors?

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DesktopVirtualization

Interview: V3 Systems CEO Peter Bookman

DesktopVirtualizationI originally arranged to interview V3 systems CEO Peter Bookman at VMworld in San Francisco back in October. However, we weren’t able to schedule the time until the final day, by which point we were both so tired that we never got past the “talking about cars” stage. I finally caught up with Peter last week, and this time we managed to get past the “talking about cars” stage. I tried to limit myself to just asking questions rather than sharing my opinion, and I’ve made a couple of edits for clarity and tidied up product names etc. where appropriate, so any errors in the transcript are mine.

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DesktopVirtualization

News: VDI Startup Pano Logic Shuts Down

DesktopVirtualizationIt has just been revealed that Bay Area desktop virtualization startup Pano Logic has shut down. The news comes from a surprising source, The Credit Union Times, which scooped the IT world to the news. The news was confirmed by a former Pano Logic employee who requested not to be named.

The Virtualization Practice has covered Pano Logic in the past as it grew from a turnkey SMB VDI solution to incorporate more enterprise class features, as well as to provide integration with Citrix XenDesktop and VMware View. It’s true breakout moment came when it introduced Pano Logic System for the cloud, an Ubuntu-based platform that ran Google Chrome at a fraction of the cost of buying either the Chromebox and Chromebook offered by Samsung and Acer. Unfortunately for Pano Logic, the move came too late, and the hoped-for education market did not materialize.

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