Tag Archives: Desktop Security

XPocalypse Now! Ten Tips for Surviving the End of (Support) Days

DesktopVirtualizationThe much-heralded XPocalypse—the end of extended support for Windows XP—is practically upon us. After thirteen years of service—beyond Microsoft’s normal service window by a good three years—Windows XP patching will finally stop. How will this affect those of us whose virtualized desktop infrastructures may still be tied, for various reasons, to the old OS?

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Bromium release vSentry 1.1: trustworthiness for more desktops in the enterprise?

PresentationVirtualizationBromium have released vSentry 1.1 which will brings Bromium’s benefits of micro-virtualization and hardware based security to a far wider range of enterprise desktops. This is the release you’ve been waiting for: and if you’ve not been waiting, this is definitely the release to consider.

We’ve spoken before about Bromium when they unveiled their micro-virtualization trustworthy security vision. Bromium’s message and focus was simple “standard workspace security is reactive, not proactive“. Whatever you have in terms of anti-virus or malware detection is only good once a new threat is found,  understood,  a patch created and deployed. This poses the very important question “what is the impact of the time delay between threat found and threat contained?”.  Bromium’s goal was to dramatically reduce that “and”.

You may contest, “ah, but I can solve this workspace threat issue by making physical desktops, virtual desktops”. This is not the case. We evidenced this in Virtual desktops (VDI) are different, but not hugely better in terms of security, than physical desktops. You do not deliver better security by simply virtualizing the desktop.

So what does vSentry v1.1 bring? How is it better than v1? What can this mean for your organisation?

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Virtual Desktop Security? Are They Secure?

There has been quite a bit of hype on whether virtual desktops provide more security than traditional desktops. All the marketing literature I have read says that it does improve overall security, but I believe this marketing literature makes several assumptions that are just not true in most organizations, and really do not account for the myriad ways data can be accessed, by limiting our scope to just virtual desktops instead of the full desktop experience we are thereby limiting our thoughts on security. Are virtual desktops more secure? Continue reading Virtual Desktop Security? Are They Secure?