Tag Archives: Data Protection

Next-Generation Data Protection: Realities

VirtualizationBackupIn the past, I have written about the next generation of data protection, which combines analytics with broader data and holistic system protection into one easy-to-use product (or set of products). The goal is to take disaster recovery to the future, when we will be able to restore and test our restores of not just our data, but also the systems required to make that data accessible, including all networking and security constructs. If you were to have a massive disaster, could your disaster recovery techniques restore your entire environment at just a push of a button? Does your disaster recovery testing feed back into analytics to determine what needs to change to make this a reality?  Continue reading Next-Generation Data Protection: Realities

The Face of the New Backup

VirtualizationBackupBackup, disaster recovery, and business continuity have changed quite a bit over the years, and they will continue to change into the future as more capability, analytics, and functionality are added to the general family of data protection tools. As we launch ourselves into the clouds, we need to perhaps rethink how we do data protection, what tools are available for data protection, and how to use our older tools to accomplish the same goals. We need an integrated data protection plan that not only accounts for cloud or data center failures but also accounts for the need to run within the cloud. There is always the need to get your data there and back again.   Continue reading The Face of the New Backup

Application Security: What Is the First Step?

VirtualizationSecurityWhat is the first step of application security? What is this step regardless of whether the process involved is DevOps or traditional silos? We have heard many answers before, such as architecture, code analysis, hardening, risk analysis, etc. But we have not really talked about the intersection of the user, application, data, and system. Perhaps this is part of architecture, but I see this as a need for all applications. Security must be able to protect the data and, simultaneously, the user. Security is about the traditional availability, confidentiality, and integrity as well as privacy these days. Continue reading Application Security: What Is the First Step?

Scope: It Is All about Scope

When to implement security and data protection practices, or even change existing ones, is all about timing, knowledge, and scope. Deciding what to implement at any particular time requires knowledge of what needs to be fixed, and also of what the future could hold. To do this properly, you need to pay close attention to the threats within your industry, understand their impact, and evaluate them based on risk. Where to obtain such knowledge is always changing, but the scope we apply the knowledge to seems to be static and not changing with the times.

Continue reading Scope: It Is All about Scope

Utopian Disaster Recovery

VirtualizationBackupRecently at Dell World, I was part of a conversation about what would be utopian disaster recovery and where we are today in the state of the industry. But where we are today is transforming, with a new name that encompasses many technologies. We are now using the term “data protection” (DP) to mean much more than just disaster recovery (DR), backup, business continuity (BC), replication, data loss prevention, and replication, but also the basic functions of confidentiality, such as encryption. The main goal of data protection is to provide a way to use your data as quickly as possible wherever it is needed and with minimal or no loss. Continue reading Utopian Disaster Recovery

Is the Backup Licensing Model About to Change?

VirtualizationBackupIs the backup licensing model about to change?  While I was at VMworld in San Francisco, I took notice of all the different Recovery-as-a-Service (RaaS) options that are available, and I believe this service has reached its maturity. The number of options and services available seems to have taken a solid leap forward in the last few years. Most of the companies follow the same type of licensing model, in that the software is licensed by the number of agents that are deployed in the environment, the number of hosts, or the amount of data being backed up. Most of the companies, except for one particular company I talked to, followed this model. Continue reading Is the Backup Licensing Model About to Change?