Articles Tagged with AWS

AWS Is the Ultimate Department of No

I find it very interesting that in-house IT is seen as “the department of ‘no’” and that AWS is considered the easy place to build things. I suspect that this points to a mismatch between what an IT department thinks is important and what its internal customers think is important. I think that AWS is one of the most inflexible IT service providers I have seen. Its services are very rigidly defined. Yet, lots of businesses see AWS as a more responsive alternative to IT departments, which they see as inflexible. I think that with a change in focus, internal IT departments can become far better at providing what the application teams require.

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DockerCon

DockerCon 2017 Roundup

DockerCon

Recently I attended DockerCon in Austin, Texas. Docker has been gaining an increased amount of interest in the enterprise for both building new greenfield applications and migrating legacy applications. Docker has become synonymous with microservices-based architectures, but enterprises are mired in legacy applications. In my experience, well over 90% of all workloads in enterprises are not microservices-based architectures, so I was interested in hearing how Docker would address this issue.

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VMware rolls back its borders with a flash sale of vCloud Air

In a not-too-unexpected move, VMware has announced the sale of its Public Cloud division. It is well-known that vCloud Air has been struggling. In a deal expected to close in Q2 2017 they have offloaded it to French Cloud hosting provider OVH. OVH defines itself as one of the largest cloud service providers in the world, with 1 million customers and 260,000 servers deployed, so roughly a quarter of a server per customer. I am pretty sure that Oracle, AWS, Google, and Azure are bigger, but there you go. Marketing at its best — OVH, one of the largest cloud service providers in the world.

Once the deal has gone through, OVH will rebrand the service as “vCloud Air Powered by OVH.” In addition, OVH will be shutting down vCloud Air’s pay-as-you-go service, ending the consumption model.

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Moving Home and Troublesome Files: Issue with Cross-Cloud

You may or may not be aware that I have just moved house, and, me being me, I have not done it by halves. My family and I up’d sticks to the other side of the world, and we landed in Perth—not Scotland, but Australia. Call it a cross-cloud migration; this obviously was fraught with difficulties and did not go as smoothly as planned. This has got me thinking about moving home in a cloud environment, whether from site to site, region to region, or cloud provider to cloud provider. In a perfect world, this should be as simple as live migration is today between like-minded virtualization hosts: VMware to VMware, Hyper-V to Hyper-V. The unfortunate truth is that this is not the case.

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It Is in the Cloud—Who Cares If It Goes Down?

Whenever AWS has an outage, it makes the news. In fact, AWS said the recent issue wasn’t even an outage, and it still made the news. Issues with S3 returning a lot of errors in the US-East-1 region caused application problems for a few hours. Personally, it affected my morning routine. I start the day reading blog posts using NewsBlur. NewsBlur wouldn’t show me any blogs. Instead, it reported server errors caused by this S3 issue, so my usual source of news couldn’t tell me that there was news about an AWS S3 issue. Before we start talking about how unreliable the cloud is, let us ask who among us has private infrastructure that is without fault? While cloud service outages make the headlines, on-premises outages happen all the time, too. Also, who cares if your application isn’t available for a few hours every couple of years? Not every application needs 100% uptime. It may be the right business decision to accept an application outage when there is an infrastructure outage.

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