Mar2017

It Is in the Cloud—Who Cares If It Goes Down?

Whenever AWS has an outage, it makes the news. In fact, AWS said the recent issue wasn’t even an outage, and it still made the news. Issues with S3 returning a lot of errors in the US-East-1 region caused application …
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Mar2017

AWS Has Taught Us about Fragile Cloud Architectures

The recent Amazon Web Services Simple Storage Service (S3) outage has taught us quite a bit about fragile cloud architectures. While many cloud providers will make hay during the next few weeks, current cloud architectures are fragile. Modern hybrid cloud …
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Jan2012

Cloud Security: Is it all Jurisdictional and Audit Issues?

When you read many blogs and articles on cloud security, writers such as myself often mention jurisdictional issues as a big problem. Nor is the ability to Audit clouds the only problem. Yet both of these are huge issues for clouds today, but fundamentally, is the cloud flawed from a security point of view or are there plenty of security mechanisms available?

Jul2010

vSphere 4.1 Improvements in Availability

With the release of vSphere 4.1 there have been some great enhancements that have been added with this release. In one of my earlier post I took a look at the vSphere 4.1 release of ESXi. This post I am going to take a look at vSphere 4.1 availability options and enhancements. So what has changed with this release? A maximum of 320 virtual machines per cluster has been firmly set. In vSphere 4.0 there were different VM/Host limitations for DRS as well as different rules for VMware HA. VMware has also raised the number of virtual machines that can be run in a single cluster from 1280 in 4.0 to 3000 in the vSphere 4.1 release. How do these improvements affect your upgrade planning?

Nov2009

Upgrades to VMware vSphere will Impact Availability and Security!

I was upgrading my nodes from VMware VI3 to VMware vSphere and used the VMware Update Manager to perform the update. Given that my existing filesystems were implemented to meet the requirements of the DISA STIG for ESX, as well as availability. I was surprised to find that when the upgrade of the first node of my cluster completed, that the install did NOT take into account my existing file system structure, but instead imposed the default file system used by the standard VMware vSphere ESX 4 installation.