Tag Archives: AppSense

VDI Printing. Is it the Nemesis it was for Terminal Services? Part II

In 1436 Johannes Gutenberg collaborated with a gem cutter and a paper mill owner to seek seed funding from venture capitalists to began work on the ‘Printing Press’.  Their invention began the ‘Print Revolution’ driving a wider spread of knowledge and new understanding, innovation and industry. Printing is so fundamental that it is often overlooked as an IT service when migrating to virtualised desktops. In Part I, we considered issues with distributed printing and what printing functions you should consider for your desktop architecture.

VDI Printing. Is it the Nemesis it was with Presentation Virtualisation? If so would client hypervisors help, or is it that traditional desktops delivery is still the best method? In Part II we’ll consider the core printing options for the likes of Citrix XenDesktop, Microsoft RDS, Quest vWorkspace and VMware View; and how they match to our printing considerations. Do you still need third party products to make your print solution effective? We’ll take an overview of solutions from ThinPrint, triCerat and UniPrint to help find out.

Hopefully you can use this knowledge to avoid any user revolution to your hosted desktop implementation, and instead, press on to get the best printing solution for your organisation.

Continue reading VDI Printing. Is it the Nemesis it was for Terminal Services? Part II

What is User Virtualization and is it worth $70 million?

70 million individual dollars can buy you a lot of things.  A 64 metre long super yacht. The services of an NFL linesman for two years. For $70  million you could entice an  English Premier League striker to play for you, but not necessarily score goals. $70  million is 113,000 Apple iPads. If you spent $100 a day, it’d take you nearly 1,950 years to get fritter it away.  Yet despite all these glittering prizes and goals, Goldman Sachs chose to invest their $70million in a chunk of AppSense.

Of all the things they could have invested in, why did choose AppSense? If the future is going to be full of cloud services, virtualised desktops, and mobile devices, why spend a not inconsiderable sum on something that sounds the stuff of science fiction?

What is User Virtualization and is it worth a $70 million dollar investment? Why would you need user virtualization? And indeed what makes AppSense stand out?

Continue reading What is User Virtualization and is it worth $70 million?

Mobile Virtual Desktops, Motorola Announce a Nirvana Phone

Early last week Darron Antill, COO at AppSense, predicted that 2011 will be a huge year for mobility, citing that by 2013 mobile phones will overtake PCs as the most common web access device worldwide. Before that week was out, Motorola announced the introduction of its hyperphone; the Motorola ATRIX 4G. As you look up from your iPads, Playbooks and Slates “oh my” you may well ask, “is this important?” Continue reading Mobile Virtual Desktops, Motorola Announce a Nirvana Phone

The Year Virtual Desktops became “Real”

Reviewing this year’s activity in the virtual desktop space has been very exciting. We have seen releases from almost all of the major vendors, and companies are beginning to truly adopt virtual desktops as a part of their overall desktop initiatives. I had the opportunity to speak with Aaron Cockerill, Senior Director of Product Management for XenDesktop at Citrix, recapping 2010, and more interestingly, looking at what’s in store for virtual desktops in the future. Continue reading The Year Virtual Desktops became “Real”

Sorting Out “Desktop Virtualization”

DesktopVirtualizationCan you use Desktop Virtualization in your organization to improve IT delivery? Desktop Virtualization, as a concept, is straightforward – separate the desktop environment from the physical machine. This gives you benefits in terms of speed of delivery, how you can provide access to mobile and remote workers, how you can ensure security and compliance.

On the other hand – Desktop Virtualization, as a task,  is complex, it requires different technologies and practices to traditional desktop deployment. The task is further complicated because Desktop Virtualization, as a term, is applied to a variety of solutions. These include VDI (Virtual Desktop Infrastructure), HVD (Hosted Virtual Desktops), DaaS (Desktops as a Service), the use of Type 1 or Type 2 Hypervisors to create a “corporate sandbox” on an end-user workstation, and finally some new and enhanced desktop management techniques that deliver benefits of “Desktop Virtualization”, but without the data center server resource typically associated with this type of solution.

A number of vendors offer desktop virtualization solutions – how can you compare those offerings and relate them to what you need your desktop delivery strategy to do for your business?

Continue reading Sorting Out “Desktop Virtualization”

RES Virtual Desktop Extender – the missing piece in the VDI puzzle?

A common barrier to desktop virtualization projects is that the new virtualized desktop is not always able to support all of the business applications. There can be a variety of reasons for this:

  • Scalability issues – the applications could be too resource intensive to run on centralised servers.
  • User Experience –  the need to access the application via a remote protocol reduces the user experience.
  • Resource Requirements – the application requires direct interaction with hardware attached to the user’s device.
  • Legacy Support – the virtualised desktop needs to support a legacy application that cannot be virtualized – perhaps the software is incompatible with the virtualised desktop OS – for example the hosted desktop is Windows 7, but the application requires Internet Explorer 6. Continue reading RES Virtual Desktop Extender – the missing piece in the VDI puzzle?